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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Holding the Fort

 
 
Holding the Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
1. Holding the Fort Marker
Inscription. Imagine being here in 1863, surrounded by Fort Sumter's ruins, when this shell (photo below) explodes on the parade ground. Throughout the Civil War the fort was the center of the bitter conflict to control Charleston Harbor. For nearly two years (1863-65) Confederate soldiers braved a night-and-day pounding from Union cannons. The Union guns reduced most of Fort Sumter to rubble, but the Confederate garrison refused to surrender.

Daily dispatches from Fort Sumter in 1863 tell of the struggle:

August 14 - A force of 470 laborers and mechanics has been engaged, in two reliefs, day and night, upon the defenses of the fort...

August 18 - The enemy opened fire with rapidity at 5 a.m. and continued till 7 p.m. Eight hundred and seventy-six shots and shells were fired; 452 struck outside, 244 inside, and 180 passed over.

August 24 - Force of 210 negros engaged all night in strengthening western magazine.... The flag-staff was shot away twice. The whole garrison worked all night.

September 4 - There is now not a single gun en barbette .... The northeastern and northwestern terre plein have fallen in... The greater portion of southern wall is down. The eastern wall is very nearly shot away....
 
Erected by Fort Sumter National Monument, South Carolina - National Park
Holding the Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2013
2. Holding the Fort Marker
Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 45.157′ N, 79° 52.493′ W. Marker is near Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Click for map. Marker is located at Fort Sumter National Monument and only reached by boat. See links below for more information about access to the site. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29412, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 15-Inch Rodman (a few steps from this marker); Arming the Fort (a few steps from this marker); Mining Casemate (a few steps from this marker); 8-Inch Columbiad (a few steps from this marker); 42-Pounder, Banded and Rifled (a few steps from this marker); Fort Sumter Today (a few steps from this marker); 10-Inch Mortar, Model 1819 (a few steps from this marker); Fort Sumter 1861-65 (a few steps from this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker. On the upper right is a photo showing the fort in 1861. Confederates pose on the terreplein of the gorge, April 15, 1861, unaware of the long years of war and the terrible siege that lay ahead. Across the center of the marker is a wartime photo showing the destruction from an interior view of the fort.
 
Also see . . .
Markers and Cannons in Front of the Right Flank Casemates image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
3. Markers and Cannons in Front of the Right Flank Casemates

1. Directions to Fort Sumter. The only way to reach the fort is by boat. Most visitors use the Spirit Line Cruises, although private boats are allowed. (Submitted on May 11, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Fort Sumter. The National Park Service web site offers many documents detailing the fort's history and role IN history. (Submitted on May 11, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Walls of Fort Sumter image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
4. Walls of Fort Sumter
The walls of Fort Sumter, particularly where brick is exposed, show the signs of wartime damage, repairs, and renovations over the years. In some sections, metal debris remains in the walls.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 662 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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