Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Liberation of Jane Johnson

 
 
The Liberation of Jane Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 14, 2010
1. The Liberation of Jane Johnson Marker
Inscription. In 1855, an enslaved woman and her two sons found freedom, aided by abolitionists William Still, Passmore Williamson, and other Undergroup Railroad activists. They escaped from their Southern owner while being transported through Philadelphia and settled later in Boston. The incident, which occured nearby, and Williamson’s subsequent imprisonment and famous trial attracted national attention, further intensifying the North-South conflict.
 
Erected 2009 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 39° 56.78′ N, 75° 8.433′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on the Walnut Street Promenade just east of Delaware Expressway (Interstate 95), in the median. Click for map. Marker is at Penn’s Landing, at the Independence Seaport Museum. It can be reached by car via South Columbus Boulevard. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Exiles for Conscience Sake (here, next to this marker); Glomar Explorer (within shouting distance of this marker); Commodore John Barry (1745 - 1803) (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct
The Liberation of Jane Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 13, 2010
2. The Liberation of Jane Johnson Marker
line); Tun Tavern (about 700 feet away); Pennsylvania Abolition Society (about 700 feet away); Philadelphia Beirut Bombing Memorial (about 800 feet away); Lorenzo L. Langstroth (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Philadelphia Korean War Memorial at Penn's Landing (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .  The Story Behind The Price of a Child. “Arriving by train from Washington D.C. on the morning of July 18, 1855 was Col. John H. Wheeler of North Carolina; his slave, Jane Johnson; and her two sons, Daniel and Isaiah. Wheeler was the American minister to Nicaragua, and his party was passing through, on their way to New York and then to Nicaragua. Unknown to Wheeler, Jane, who’d seen one son sold away, had no intention of traveling to Central America or remaining a slave. Her plan was to leave Wheeler and escape with her children to freedom as soon as they were safely north of slavery.” (Submitted on May 14, 2010.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans
 
Marker at Independence Seaport Museum image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 13, 2010
3. Marker at Independence Seaport Museum
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 807 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement