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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Walnut Street Prison

 
 
Walnut Street Prison Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 15, 2010
1. Walnut Street Prison Marker
Inscription. One of the nationís first urban penal institutions, it confined felons, prisoners of war, Tories, and debtors from 1775 to 1838. Extending from Walnut Street to Locust Street, it was the site of numerous riots. The prison was replaced by Eastern State Penitentiary.
 
Erected 2008 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 39° 56.85′ N, 75° 9.05′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on South 6th Street just south of Walnut Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. It is across from Washington Park. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome to Washington Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Bicentennial Moon Tree (within shouting distance of this marker); In Memory of the Many American Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker); Penn's Plan (within shouting distance of this marker); The Capital City (within
Walnut Street Prison Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 15, 2010
2. Walnut Street Prison Marker
shouting distance of this marker); A Fashionable Promenade (within shouting distance of this marker); Sorrow and Joy (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .  Walnut Street Prison. “It was the Quakers of Philadelphia who came up with the concept for what they called a penitentiary—a place where prisoners could reflect on their crime and become truly sorry for what they had done. The Quakers believed that through reflection and repentance, inmates would give up crime and leave prison rehabilitated. Shortly after the American Revolution, a group of Quakers formed the Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons, whose goal was made clear in its name. (Later the group became known as the Pennsylvania Prison Society.) In the years after the Revolution this group worked to encourage prison reform, and its efforts finally paid off in 1790 when the Walnut Street Jail became the first state penitentiary in the country.” (Submitted on May 15, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,014 times since then and 103 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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