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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Logan Log House

 
 
Logan Log House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
1. Logan Log House Marker
Inscription.
Andrew Logan built this house in the late 1700s. The house was the first home built in the nearby town of Greenwood, SC and was actually found hidden in the core of an old house. It was moved here in 1968 where it was put under the protection of the Star Fort Commission then the National Park Service.

Today it is used as an interpretive tool and stands as an excellent example of an early American two story log house. The Logan House helps us connect to our past by being a great example of early American life and preserves a building that represents how life used to be.
 
Erected 2009 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 34° 8.801′ N, 82° 1.421′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker can be reached from South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248). Click for map. Marker is located on the outside wall of the cabin near the main (west) entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Logan Log House (within shouting distance of this marker); Ninety Six in the American Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); Why Is It Called Ninety Six?
Circa 1787 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
2. Circa 1787 Marker
Andrew Logan was the builder of this house around 1787. It was the first house built in the nearby town of Greenwood and was found in 1967 hidden in the core of an old house on Spring Street. It was moved to this site in 1971. It is portrayed as a backcountry tavern of the late 1700s. Taverns played a vital role in the community's life of this period. It was a place where a night's lodging, food and drink could be purchased.
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Siege of Ninety Six (within shouting distance of this marker); Ninety Six National Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Walking Tour of the Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Monument to James Birmingham (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); James Birmingham (about 300 feet away); 96 (about 400 feet away); First Blood Shed for Liberty (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced a marker entitled "Circa 1787."
 
Also see . . .
1. Ninety Six National Historic Site. The historic district of Ninety Six National Historic Site contains numerous historical features associated with the economic and social development of the colonial South Carolina back country. (Submitted on May 15, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Ninety Six National Historic Site. Here settlers struggled against the harsh backcountry to survive,
Logan Log House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 25, 2008
3. Logan Log House
Cherokee Indians hunted and fought to keep their land, two towns and a trading post were formed and abandoned to the elements, and two Revolutionary War battles that claimed over 100 lives took place here. (Submitted on May 15, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Logan Log House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
4. Logan Log House
Logan Log House Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
5. Logan Log House Interior
Black Swan Tavern Sign (Previous Name of the Cabin) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
6. Black Swan Tavern Sign (Previous Name of the Cabin)
Beehive Oven image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
7. Beehive Oven
Modeled after actual 18th century ovens, this example of a beehive oven was made by three volunteers and has been used to bake items such as cakes, breads, cookies, and pies.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,168 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on July 11, 2016.
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