Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Logan Log House

 
 
Logan Log House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
1. Logan Log House Marker
Inscription.
Built by Andrew Logan in the late 1700s, this well preserved example of a log house of that time was discovered in nearby Greenwood. The historic stricture has been hidden under siding and obscured by alterations from a much later period. Realizing its value as an extraordinary artifact, the Star Fort Commission, which managed this site before the National Park Service, had it moved here in 1968.

The two-story house of logs and chinking mortar is typical of colonial-era backcountry buildings. A fireplace would have been used for heat and cooking, furniture would have been scant and simply, and animals might have been quartered in a side-yard pen. The Logan Log House is now used for living history programs.
 
Erected 2009 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 34° 8.788′ N, 82° 1.414′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker can be reached from South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248). Click for map. Marker is located south of the cabin. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Logan Log House (within shouting distance of this marker); Ninety Six in the American Revolution
House in which Logan Log House was Found image. Click for full size.
By Greenwood Index-Journal, 1960
2. House in which Logan Log House was Found
(within shouting distance of this marker); Why Is It Called Ninety Six? (within shouting distance of this marker); The Siege of Ninety Six (within shouting distance of this marker); Ninety Six National Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Walking Tour of the Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Monument to James Birmingham (within shouting distance of this marker); James Birmingham (within shouting distance of this marker); First Blood Shed for Liberty (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); 96 (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ninety Six National Historic Site. The historic district of Ninety Six National Historic Site contains numerous historical features associated with the economic and social development of the colonial South Carolina back country. (Submitted on May 15, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Ninety Six National Historic Site. Here settlers struggled against the
Logan Log House Before Restoration image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
3. Logan Log House Before Restoration
harsh backcountry to survive, Cherokee Indians hunted and fought to keep their land, two towns and a trading post were formed and abandoned to the elements, and two Revolutionary War battles that claimed over 100 lives took place here. (Submitted on May 15, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Logan Log House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
4. Logan Log House Marker
Logan Log House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
5. Logan Log House and Marker
Logan Log House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 25, 2008
6. Logan Log House
Logan Log House Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 16, 2010
7. Logan Log House Interior
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,015 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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