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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Japanese Monument to The Heroes of the Alamo

 
 
Japanese Monument to The Heroes of the Alamo image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 29, 2010
1. Japanese Monument to The Heroes of the Alamo
Inscription.
To the Memory of
The Heroes of the Alamo

[Poem in Chinese follows]

Japanese Monument

The story of the Alamo reaches far beyond the borders of Texas. More than 2.6 million visitors from around the world came to the Alamo in 1996. The DRT provides written information on the site in several different languages, including Spanish, German, French, Japanese, and Italian. This granite monument attests to the Alamo's fame and popularity.

Shigetaka Shiga, a Japanese geography professor, presented the monument to the Alamo in 1914. Etched on its face is a poem he composed that compares the Alamo and its heroes to a famous incident in Japanese history. The Siege of Nagashino Castle, fought in 1575, involved circumstances similar to those that took place at the Alamo in 1836. One of the defenders of Nagashino Castle, Torii Suneemon, left the castle to find help. Captured upon his return, he chose death rather than betray his friends. Professor Shiga compared Torii Suneemon to James Butler Bonham who also left his friends at the Alamo to find help, only to face death when he returned.

Although Japanese, Professor Shiga wrote the poem in classical Chinese. The granite for the monument was quarried near Nagashino, Japan. The stone on which the monument sits came from the vicinity
To The Memory of The Heroes of The Alamo image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 29, 2010
2. To The Memory of The Heroes of The Alamo
of Torii Suneemon's grave.

Copies of the poem are available in Alamo Shrine upon request.
 
Erected 1914 by Professor Shigetaka Juko Shiga.
 
Location. 29° 25.566′ N, 98° 29.166′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Click for map. Monument is in the Convento Courtyard of the Alamo Mission complex. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 Alamo Plaza, San Antonio TX 78205, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Mission Period (a few steps from this marker); Tennessee Volunteers at the Alamo (a few steps from this marker); Mission Mill (and Millstone) (within shouting distance of this marker); Clara Driscoll (within shouting distance of this marker); The Alamo (within shouting distance of this marker); Spanish Mission and Military Post (within shouting distance of this marker); The Alamo in 1836 (within shouting distance of this marker); Ruins of the Habitations of the Friars and Indians (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .
1. Shigetaka Shiga. (Submitted on May 16, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. The Japanese in Texas. (Submitted on May 16, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
Background on Japanese Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 29, 2010
3. Background on Japanese Monument

3. Defenders of the Alamo. (Submitted on May 16, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Forts, CastlesHeroesMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, Texas Independence
 
Japanese Monument to The Heroes of the Alamo image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 29, 2010
4. Japanese Monument to The Heroes of the Alamo
Looking NNW.
Sponsor of the Japanese Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 29, 2010
5. Sponsor of the Japanese Monument
Japanese Monument Stone image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 29, 2010
6. Japanese Monument Stone
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 3,559 times since then and 108 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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