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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Blue Ridge Summit in Franklin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Monterey Pass

 
 
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
1. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
Inscription. After Captain Emack placed his troops near the Monterey House, Custer's men consisting of a portion of the 1st and 5th Michigan Cavalry began their advance. The 5th Michigan was sent toward the right to protect Kilpatrick's right flank. A small portion of the 1st Michigan Cavalry was ordered to dismount and continue on the main road, forcing Captain Emack's men to slowly fall back further westward until Custer's Brigade gained the eastern half of Monterey. Captain Emack had to withdraw his force back to eastern side of Maria Furnace Road (Known as the Devils Recourse on the map) where it connected to the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike.

General Kilpatrick stopped at the Monterey House where David Miller and Jacob Baer were held as prisoners. Mr. Miller and General Kilpatrick discussed the roads of the area and where they led. Mr. Miller informed General Kilpatrick of Mount Zion Road that led into Smithsburg and Leitersburg. General Kilpatrick wanted to send a regiment of his cavalry down the western side of the mountain so they could try and cut off the Confederate wagon train. General Kilpatrick ordered Lt. Colonel Preston of the 1st Vermont Cavalry to take Mr. Buhrman as his guide and take the road leading to Smithsburg.

General Kilpatrick also ordered Colonel Town to take a regiment to head off the wagon train East
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
2. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
of Monterey. A portion of the 1st Michigan Cavalry under Lt. Colonel Peter Stagg was sent upon modern day Furnace Road that led to Fairfield Gap in order to try to head off the Confederate wagon train coming out of Fairfield.

As all of this was happening at the same time, General Kilpatrick had made plans of an attack from the east and west, he now had to concentrate on gaining the actual mountain pass of Monterey.
 
Location. 39° 44.327′ N, 77° 28.141′ W. Marker is near Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania, in Franklin County. Marker is on Charmain Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located in front of the Hawley Memorial Church. Marker is in this post office area: Blue Ridge Summit PA 17214, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (here, next to this marker); Monterey Academy (approx. 0.4 miles away); 10,000 Soldiers Fight at Monterey Pass (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (approx. half a mile away); Brown's Spring (approx. half a mile away); Battle of Monterey Pass/Michigan Cavalry Brigade
Site of Monterey Inn image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
3. Site of Monterey Inn
The Inn stood near the intersection of Charmain Road and Monterey Lane, a short walk west of the marker location.
(approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Battle of Fountain Dale (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Blue Ridge Summit.
 
More about this marker. On the lower right is a photo and a map. The photo shows The Monterey Inn as it appeared in 1865. The Monterey Inn was destroyed by fire early in the morning of July 2, 1942. The map shows the route in blue the Union Cavalry took. The route of the Confederate wagon train is marked in red. You are currently located near the area that has "x" on the map.
 
Also see . . .  Monterey Pass Battlefield Association. The association provides many resources including a guide to the battlefield. (Submitted on May 22, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
David Miller Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
4. David Miller Memorial
Located about 200 yards east of the church were the marker stands, this memorial recalls David Miller mentioned on the marker. It reads:
In rememberance of the kindness
of
David Miller
for thirty five years proprietor of
Clermont
this tablet has been placed
by his neighbors
A.D. 1900
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,349 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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