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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern

 
 
“A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
1. “A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern Marker
Inscription. Built in 1759 with adjoining Paschall House. Last of the 18th century inns of colonial Philadelphia owned by Colonel Blaithewaite Jones, who was in charge of the Delaware River defenses of Philadelphia during the Revolution, and John Wood, famous clockmaker. Restored by the Knauer Foundation.
 
Location. 39° 56.671′ N, 75° 8.679′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on Spruce Street just east of South 2nd Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Philadelphia Korean War Memorial at Penn's Landing (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Purple Heart Memorial (about 500 feet away); Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial (about 600 feet away); Society Hill / The New Market and Head House (about 600 feet away); Philadelphia Beirut Bombing Memorial (about 600 feet away); Capt. Charles Massey House (about 700 feet away); Fraunces Tavern (about 700 feet away); The House of Samuel Powel (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Man Full of Trouble Tavern. Drinking establishments
“A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
2. “A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern
Tablet is to the right of the leftmost door.
in Colonial Philadelphia, be they in the form of coffee houses, taverns, or unlicensed ‘tippling houses,’ were more than places to drink and dine. Taverns were where the community conducted business, got its news, argued politics, attended concerts and auctions, socialized, or just plain got polluted.

“In Philadelphia’s early years there were no separate buildings which served as dance halls, theaters, or clubs — taverns, instead, provided all-purpose service. Until the Revolutionary Era, taverns and inns were the largest public buildings in Philadelphia. (Submitted on May 29, 2010.) 

2. Philadelphia's Last surviving Colonial Tavern. (Submitted on August 14, 2015, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
“A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern Shingle image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
3. “A Man Full of Trouble” Tavern Shingle
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 961 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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