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Farmville in Prince Edward County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

R. R. Moton High School

Farmville, Virginia

 

—Prince Edward County —

 
R. R. Moton High School CRIEHT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 29, 2010
1. R. R. Moton High School CRIEHT Marker
Inscription. On this site of the former R.R. Moton High School, the actions of some brave African-American students to achieve equal educational opportunities for blacks eventually led to the end of legal segregation in American public schools.

Moton High School was built to house 180 black students. On April 23, 1951, it held 450 instead, with some classes conducted in “tar-paper shacks,” resulting in a student walkout protesting the unequal facilities, course offerings and buses. Within weeks the students sought legal redress of their grievances. The NAACP agreed to support a suit for school integration, believing that goal to be in the best interest of the community. The subsequent case, Davis et al. v. County School Board of Prince Edward, was decided by the United States Supreme Court in 1954 in its landmark Brown v. Board decision, which stated that “in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place.” A second Brown decision in 1955 mandated that integration be achieved “with all deliberate speed.”

Rather than integrate its public schools, Prince Edward County withheld funds for all public education. As a result, all of the county’s public schools were closed from 1959 until 1964, when the Supreme Court ruled in Griffin v. Prince Edward that localities
Students attend classes in tar-paper buildings, c.1953 image. Click for full size.
2. Students attend classes in tar-paper buildings, c.1953
must fund and operate public schools.

Today, Prince Edward’s fully integrated public schools bear the legacy of a fight for civil rights in education that began here with a courageous, non-violent act by a group of high school students and resulted in three historic United States Supreme Court rulings. In 1998 the site was designated a National Historic Landmark. In 2001 it formally opened as a museum.
 
Erected by Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail®. (Marker Number 24.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 37° 17.475′ N, 78° 23.854′ W. Marker is in Farmville, Virginia, in Prince Edward County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Griffin Boulevard and Barrow Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 900 Griffin Boulevard, Farmville VA 23901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Robert Russa Moton High School (within shouting distance of this marker); Longwood College (approx. 0.4 miles away); Longwood University (approx. half a mile away); Farmville Female Seminary Association
R. R. Moton High School Site image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 29, 2010
3. R. R. Moton High School Site
(approx. 0.7 miles away); First Baptist Church (approx. 0.7 miles away); Beulah AME Church (approx. 0.7 miles away); Four Sororities Founded (approx. 0.7 miles away); Main Street - Mayor J. David Crute - EACO Theatre (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Farmville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of Brown v. Board of Education markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail. Virginia's Retreat (Submitted on May 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. The Robert Russa Moton Museum. (Submitted on May 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
3. Robert Russa Moton High School (pdf files). National Register of Historic Places (Submitted on May 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducationGovernmentNotable BuildingsNotable Events
 
Exterior View - Moton High School image. Click for full size.
By Nara, circa 1953
4. Exterior View - Moton High School
National Archives [No.21-51E83-CA1333DAVIS(AB)]
Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail® Map image. Click for full size.
5. Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail® Map
Appomattox County
1. Winonah Camp/Mozella Price Home
2. Carver-Price School
3. Education in 1800's Rural Virginia

Buckingham County
4. One-Room Schoolhouse
5. Carter G. Woodson Birthplace

Cumberland County
6. Hamilton High School
7. Rosenwald School at Cartersville
8. Jackson Davis

Amelia County
9. Russell Grove Presbyterian Church and School
10. Mrs. Samantha Jane Neil

Chesterfield County
11. Virginia State University

Petersburg
12. Earliest Known Public High School for African Americans in Virginia
13. McKenney Library
14. The Peabody-Williams School

Dinwiddie County
15. Southside Virginia Training Center
16. Rocky Branch School
17. Early Education in Dinwiddie County

Nottoway County
18. Blackstone Female Institute
19. Mt. Nebo Church
20. Ingleside Training Institute

Lunenburg County
21. The People's Community Center
22. St. Matthew's Lutheran Church Christian Day School

Prince Edward County
23. Prince Edward County Public Schools
24. R. R. Moton High School
25. Farmville Female Seminary Association
26. First Baptist Church
27. Beulah AME Church
28. Hampden-Sydney College

Charlotte County
29. Southside Virginia Community College - John H. Daniel Campus
30. Charlotte County Library
31. Salem School

Halifax County
32. Meadville Community Center
33. Mary M. Bethune High School
34. Washington-Coleman Elementary School
35. Mizpah Church

Mecklenburg County
36. Thyne Institute
37. Boydton Academic and Bible Institute

Brunswick County
38. Southside Virginia Community College - Christanna Campus
39. Saint Paul's College
40. Hospital and School of the Good Shepherd
41. Fort Christanna
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,660 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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