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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chandler in Henderson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

John Crane

 
 
John Crane Marker image. Click for full size.
By Amanda Hartley, June 5, 2010
1. John Crane Marker
Inscription. In 1830, John Crane applied to be a part of Joseph Vehlein's colony. Reportedly from Virginia, he was a veteran of the War of 1812. He moved his wife and seven children to what is now Walker County, Texas, in 1834. There, he organized men and became a part of the Texas Revolution. He fought at the Siege of Bexar in December 1835. The next year, he was involved in the Runaway Scrape and also served in the Texas Army in John M. Wade's Cavalry Company.

Following the Texas Revolution, Crane remained with the army. While Republic of Texas president Sam Houston encouraged settlers to coexist with Native American tribes, Mirabeau B. Lamar's subsequent administration took steps to remove the Indians from the land. The resulting conflicts became known as the Cherokee War. It culminated in the 1839 Battle of the Neches, fought in Henderson and Van Zandt counties. Communication had broken down between representatives of the Republic and Chief Bowles (or Duwali) of the Cherokee tribe. Companies under the leadership of Kelsey H. Douglass, Edward Burleson and Gen. Thomas J. Rusk engaged Bowles' forces on July 15, 1839, on what is today known as Battle Creek. John Crane and a Doctor Rogers were both killed. The fighting continued the following day, when Chief Bowles was also killed. His death led to the eventual expulsion of his people from Texas. Crane and Rogers are believed to be buried in unmarked graves outside of Chandler on part
Marker in Arlie McCain Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Amanda Hartley, June 5, 2010
2. Marker in Arlie McCain Memorial Park
This is the a view of the John Crane marker where it is located inside the Arlie McCain Memorial Park.
of the battlefield (now private property).

Although some elements of Crane's military service are unknown, including his military rank, he remains an important figure in Texas history. Today, he is remembered as a patriot and early settler, a pioneer in the Republic of Texas.
 
Erected 2004 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 12952.)
 
Location. 32° 18.375′ N, 95° 29.354′ W. Marker is near Chandler, Texas, in Henderson County. Marker is on Texas Route 31 0.2 miles west of Parker Street (County Road 3302), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is located in Arlie McCain Memorial Park, just west of Chandler on SH 31. Marker is in this post office area: Chandler TX 75758, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Yarborough House (approx. 0.8 miles away); Cherokee Exodus from Texas (approx. 1.2 miles away); Rock Hill Cemetery (approx. 3.1 miles away); County Line Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 4.5 miles away); The Major John Dean House (approx. 4.8 miles away); Wood-Verner Cemetery (approx. 6 miles away); Pleasant Retreat United Methodist Church (approx. 6.8 miles away); Smith County (approx. 6.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chandler.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Markers
John Crane Marker seen along State Highway 31 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 17, 2012
3. John Crane Marker seen along State Highway 31
related to the Battle of the Neches.
 
Categories. HeroesNative AmericansPatriots & Patriotism
 
Arlie McCain Memorial Park Dedication Marker image. Click for full size.
By Amanda Hartley, June 5, 2010
4. Arlie McCain Memorial Park Dedication Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Amanda Hartley of Tyler, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,117 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Amanda Hartley of Tyler, Texas.   3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Amanda Hartley of Tyler, Texas. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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