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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brattonsville in York County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bethesda Presbyterian Church

 
 
Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, June 5, 2010
1. Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
(Side A)
This church, which held services as early as 1760 about 1 mi. E, gave its name to a Scots-Irish community in this area before the Revolution. It was formally organized in 1769 by Rev. William Richardson. In 1771 John Fondren donated land here for a second frame church, built ca. 1780 after the church 1 mi. E burned.

(Side B)
Rev. Robert B. Walker (1766-1852), the first permanent minister, served here 1794-1834. Bethesda hosted many revivals during the Second Great Awakening. The cemetery dates to 1777, and this brick church was built in 1820. The church and cemetery were listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.
 
Erected 2010 by Erected by the Congregation for its 250th Anniversary, 2010. (Marker Number 46-48.)
 
Location. 34° 53.88′ N, 81° 10.642′ W. Marker is in Brattonsville, South Carolina, in York County. Marker is on McConnells Hwy. (South Carolina Route 322), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4858 McConnells Hwy, Mc Connells SC 29726, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Huck's Defeat (approx. 1.7 miles away); Bratton Home
Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, June 5, 2010
2. Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker (Side B)
(approx. 2.2 miles away); Backwoods Cabin (approx. 2.2 miles away); William Bratton Plantation/Battle of Huck's Defeat (approx. 2.2 miles away); Field of Huck's Defeat (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Battle of Huck’s Defeat (approx. 2.3 miles away); Brick Kitchen (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Homestead (approx. 2.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. National Register of Historic Places. (Submitted on June 6, 2010, by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina.)
2. . Information on link is listed under Additional comments. (Submitted on June 6, 2010, by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina.) 

3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History entry for the Bethesda Presbyterian Church. (Submitted on June 14, 2010, by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina.)
 
Additional comments.
1. National Register
One of the oldest churches in the South Carolina Upcountry, Bethesda Presbyterian Church is also one of the four original Presbyterian churches in the state’s old York District. A mission (church) is believed to have existed as early as 1760 and Bethesda was formally organized about 1769 or 1770. From 1800 to 1863, the congregation
Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, June 5, 2010
3. Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker
held large camp meetings associated with the Second Great Awakening. Bethesda’s present structure, built in 1820, is the third building associated with the church. Bethesda represents the typical rural brick church in an expanded meetinghouse form. The interior reveals a double-aisle configuration with side aisles under the gallery. Although Victorian motifs have been added both to the interior and exterior, the basic architectural integrity of the church has been retained. The gallery is supported by square columns of ca. 1882 vintage on the first level and original octagonal columns on the second level. The narthex wall dates from 1917 but the original gallery stairs are intact. Other 1882 alterations include the semicircular-arched pulpit niche, the pews with scroll motifs and the widened windows with 2/2 sash. The pulpit furniture and lighting fixtures also date from 1882. Also significant in its own right is Bethesda’s cemetery. Among those buried there are veterans of the American Revolution, Mexican War, Civil War, and both World Wars. Listed in the National Register August 16, 1977.
    — Submitted June 6, 2010, by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Colonial EraNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Bethesda Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, July 11, 2009
4. Bethesda Presbyterian Church
Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, July 11, 2009
5. Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery
Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, July 11, 2009
6. Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery Marker
The original site of Bethesda Church was located about one mile east of this spot. Around the original meetinghouse were deposited the dead. In 1979 only 3 grave markers could be found at the old site and these were removed and placed here. Known to have been buried there also was Henry Neely, husband of Elizabeth. He was born in the last quarter of the 17th century and died after 1778. He was the first ruling elder of Bethesda. His son, Samuel was the first elder of Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church, 1770.
Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery 1769 image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, July 11, 2009
7. Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery 1769
Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, July 11, 2009
8. Bethesda Presbyterian Church Marker
Bethesda Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Wes Cox, July 11, 2009
9. Bethesda Presbyterian Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 917 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina.   9. submitted on , by Wes Cox of Union, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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