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Tampa in Hillsborough County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo

 
 
Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
1. Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Marker
Inscription. When local segration forced the withdrawal of Afro-Cubans from El Club Nacional Cubano, an organization of black and white Cubans involved in Cuban independence, Afro-Cuban cigarmakers founded a society in 1900 as Los Libres Pensadores de Marti y Maceo. Ruperto Pedroso, well known Afro-Cuban patriot, was among the 23 original founders. The club merged with La Union in 1904, resulting in the new name, La Union Marti-Maceo. In 1909 members completed construction of a two-story clubhouse at 11th St. and 6th Ave. With an average membership of about 300, the club offered full medical benefits and a stipend for sick members, as well as social, cultural, and educational activities. During the depression of the 1930s, many Afro-Cubans left Tampa. Membership declined and benefits were reduced, but the club continued in operation. Urban Renewal demolished the original building in 1965, and members moved to the present location. By the late 1960s, few members remained and it appeared the organization would cease to exist. In the early 1970s the return of a large number of retirees who had left Ybor City as children, resulted in increased membership and a revitalization of the organization.
 
Erected 1998 by City of Tampa, Ybor City Development Corp.and Florida Dept. of
Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo and Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 8, 2010
2. Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo and Marker
The club's headquarters, viewed from East 7th Avenue (La SÚptima) in July of 2010.
State. (Marker Number F-387.)
 
Location. 27° 57.62′ N, 82° 26.758′ W. Marker is in Tampa, Florida, in Hillsborough County. Marker is on East 7th Avenue (Florida Route 45), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located in Ybor City Historic District of Tampa, between North 13th St and Nuccio Parkway. Marker is in this post office area: Tampa FL 33605, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rough Riders (a few steps from this marker); Ybor City Historic District (within shouting distance of this marker); Jose Marti (within shouting distance of this marker); Cradle of Cuban Liberty (within shouting distance of this marker); Antonio Maceo Grajales (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); La Casa de Pedroso (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named La Casa de Pedroso (about 300 feet away); “Cuba” (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Tampa.
 
Regarding Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo. Translated from the marker; Los Libres Pensadores de Marti y Maceo translates to The Free Thinkers of Marti and Maceo.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sociedad La Union Marti-Maceo, The History ~ Ybor City's Afro-Cuban Club since 1900.
Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, December 13, 2008
3. Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Marker
Jose Marti (1835-1895) was born in Havana in 1853. Jose Marti is considered one of the great writers of the Hispanic world. Marti believed that freedom and justice should be the conerstone of any government. His writings condemn all despotic regimes and the abridgement of human rights.
Antonio Maceo (1848-1896), or General Antonio Maceo Grajales, was the second-in-command of the Cuban army of independence. Commonly known as the "The Bronze Titan," Maceo was one of the the outstanding guerilla leaders in nineteenth century Latin America. (Submitted on January 7, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. The Afro-Cuban Community in Ybor City and Tampa, 1886-1910. Magazine of History Volume 7, No 4 Clubs like La Union Marti-Maceo, the Obreras de La Independencia and El Circulo Cubano were active in raising funds, printing revolutionary pamphlets and working with the PRC. Not one of the clubs, however, was racially integrated. By the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, La Union Marti Maceo was a male Afro-Cuban club, La Obrera de la Independencia included only white Cuban women, and white Cuban males comprised the membership of El Circulo Cubano. (Submitted on January 7, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAfrican AmericansFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsHispanic Americans
 
Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Marker
Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo: Painted Tilework image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 8, 2010
5. Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo: Painted Tilework
The tiles adorning the building's front facade read:

1226
Sociedad
La Union Marti-Maceo Inc.
Fundado en 1904

(English: Union Society Marti-Maceo, Founded in 1904)


The bottom portion of the tiles features the heraldic arms of Cuba flanked by portraits of Jose Marti and Gen. Antonio Maceo., painted by Carol Baker Curtiss of San Do Designs, Tampa.
Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Wall art image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, December 13, 2008
6. Sociedad La Union Marti~Maceo Wall art
Jose Marti, as mentioned image. Click for full size.
7. Jose Marti, as mentioned
Antonio Maceo, Cuba, c.1895, Postcard, photographer unknown. image. Click for full size.
8. Antonio Maceo, Cuba, c.1895, Postcard, photographer unknown.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,810 times since then and 13 times this year. Last updated on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.   3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.   6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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