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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Raleigh in Wake County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

North Carolina Dental Society

 
 
North Carolina Dental Society Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, May 15, 2010
1. North Carolina Dental Society Marker
Inscription. Organized in 1856 in the Guion Hotel, which stood here. Dr. W.F. Bason, Haw River, first president.
 
Erected 1975. (Marker Number H-65.)
 
Location. 35° 46.876′ N, 78° 38.372′ W. Marker is in Raleigh, North Carolina, in Wake County. Marker is on West Edonton Street 0.1 miles east of North Salisbury Street. Click for map. Across the street from the historic Capitol building to the north. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 West Edonton Street, Raleigh NC 27601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. North Carolina Bar Association (a few steps from this marker); State of North Carolina Labor Building (a few steps from this marker); State of North Carolina Agriculture Building (a few steps from this marker); North Carolina State Capitol (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolina (within shouting distance of this marker); Blakely Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Lawson Wyatt (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolina Veterans' Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Raleigh.
 
Regarding North Carolina Dental Society. The North Carolina
North Carolina Dental Society Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 6, 2013
2. North Carolina Dental Society Marker
Dental Society, the third oldest dental association in the United States, was founded in May 1856 at the Guion Hotel in Raleigh. The nascent organization held high professional standards, requiring each member to be an alumnus of quality medical or dental schools. The group was responsible for the passing of several of the state’s first health codes.

The eight original founders of the Dental Society were all graduates of the Baltimore College of Dentistry. Founded in 1840, the school was the birthplace of the Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.) degree, and is considered the first dental college in the United States. The first president of the society was William F. Bason, known as the “merciful dentist” for his early use of anesthesia. A new president, E. H. Andrews, was elected the following year, and held the position through the 1860s.

The Civil War interrupted the annual meetings of the Society, and their efforts on behalf of the state’s citizens. Most of the charter members served as Confederate medical officers, and several such as Ransom P. Bessent and E. H. Andrews spent time as prisoners of war.

The society resumed its duties after the war, continuing to promote dental health within the state. Membership in the organization expanded considerably in the early twentieth century, as dentistry became widespread in North Carolina. In
North Carolina Dental Society Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 6, 2013
3. North Carolina Dental Society Marker
1906 the North Carolina Dental Society began publishing a journal for its members. One of the first female members was Dr. Rosebud Morse Garriott of Yadkin County. African-Americans were welcomed into the group starting in the 1970s. The Society continues to serve North Carolina offering several different programs for citizens, and lobbying for dental health issues in the state legislature.

References:
(1) J. Martin Fleming, The History of the North Carolina Dental Society (1939)
(2) Journal of the North Carolina Dental Society (1906-present)
(3) William S. Powell, ed., The Encyclopedia of North Carolina (2006)—sketch by Jay Mazzochi
(4) North Carolina Dental website: http://www.ncdental.org/
 
Also see . . .
1. North Carolina Dental Society: NCDS History. (Submitted on June 10, 2010, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.)
2. StoppingPoints: North Carolina Dental Society. (Submitted on June 10, 2010, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.)
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USScience & Medicine
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This page has been viewed 738 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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