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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Trinity Methodist Church Original Site / William Hammett

 
 
Trinity Methodist Church Original Site / William Hammett Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, June 13, 2010
1. Trinity Methodist Church Original Site / William Hammett Marker
Inscription.
Trinity Methodist Church Original Site
The first Trinity Church building was erected on this site in 1792. By 1813, Trinity had joined the S. C. Conference, and in 1874 it merged with Cumberland Church, the oldest Methodist church in Charleston, founded in 1786. In 1926, Trinity moved to its present location at 273 Meeting Street where the church and cemetery records are now located.

William Hammett
An Irishman from Belfast who was ordained by John Wesley, William Hammet was a missionary sent to America by the British Conference. He came to Charleston in 1791 from Jamaica and founded Trinity Methodist Church after a schism occurred within Cumberland Church between his followers and those of Bishop Asbury. Hammet called his church the "Primitive Methodist Church" and was pastor of Trinity until 1803.
 
Erected 2005 by Trinity United Methodist Church. (Marker Number 10-8.)
 
Location. 32° 46.968′ N, 79° 55.848′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Hasell Street and Maiden Lane, on the right when traveling east on Hasell Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Trinity Methodist Church Original Site / William Hammett Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, June 13, 2010
2. Trinity Methodist Church Original Site / William Hammett Marker
Reverse side
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Col. William Rhett House (within shouting distance of this marker); William Rhett House (within shouting distance of this marker); William C. McElheran House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. Peter's Catholic Church (about 400 feet away); Dr. Joseph Johnson House†† (about 600 feet away); Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim (about 700 feet away); St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaces one erected in 1970 by the Pee Dee Chapter Colonial Dames of the XVII Century.
 
Also see . . .  Photos of Trinity Methodist Church in Charleston, SC. Here is a link to photos of Trinity Methodist Church as part of a modern photographic project of America's historic churches and synagogues. (Submitted on January 24, 2011, by Steven Hyatt of Charleston, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Trinity's Place in Early Methodism
Methodism in America was organized officially at the “Christmas Conference” in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1784. On February 27, 1785, Francis Asbury arrived in Charleston, South Carolina, where he founded the cityís first
Trinity Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, May 27, 2011
3. Trinity Methodist Church
Methodist congregation. This would become the Cumberland Street Methodist Episcopal Church with 35 white and 23 black members in 1786.

The fifth session of the South Carolina Conference began at Cumberland Street Church in February, 1791, but it was held over a day or two pending the arrival of Dr. Thomas Coke who had been shipwrecked off Edisto Island. Coke was traveling from Jamaica in the company of Rev. William Hammet, a native of Ireland and a member of the British Conference. Hammet had been preaching in the West Indies since 1786 with some success, but he also faced some strong opposition to Methodism's antislavery principle. Since Hammet had become very ill, Coke brought him to Charleston for a change of climate and situation. At the Conference in Charleston, Hammetís inspired preaching captivated the congregation, some of whom demanded that the eloquent Irishman be assigned as Cumberlandís pastor.

Asbury already had issued pastoral appointments, and he would not consider permitting a congregation to select itís own minister. Hammet followed Asbury from Charleston to Philadelphia, then to New York. By May, 1791, Asbury had consented to appoint Hammet as the assistant minister for Cumberland. Hammet refused the appointment and returned to Charleston.

On November 28, 1791, Hammet disavowed “Asbury Methodism” led half of the white
Trinity Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, May 27, 2011
4. Trinity Methodist Church
members out of Cumberland Street Church to form a new denomination called “Primitive Methodism." He named his new congregation Trinity. Hammet gathered his followers in Charlestonís Market for services, but on February 14, 1792, he bought a large plot of land at the corner of Hasell Street and Maiden Lane. There he built a parsonage and the first Trinity sanctuary.

The original Trinity Primitive Methodist Church, a wooden structure, burned in the Charleston fire of 1838. It was replaced immediately by a brick building which stood until 1902 after having suffered fire, federal bombardment during the Civil War, hurricanes, and an earthquake. The last Trinity sanctuary on Hasell Street was used only 24 years by the congregation.

From the church history of Trinity United Methodist Church.
    — Submitted June 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable Persons
 
Trinity Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History
5. Trinity Methodist Church
Current church on Meeting Street
Trinity Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, May 27, 2011
6. Trinity Methodist Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,304 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   5. submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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