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Wardensville in Hardy County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wardensville

Crossroads of War

 
 
Wardensville - Crossroads of War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, May 30, 2010
1. Wardensville - Crossroads of War Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, most of Wardensville's two hundred residents supported the Confederacy. Southern guerrillas found friends here. On May 7, 1862, Union Col. Stephen W. Downey arrived here with a mixed force of infantry and cavalry, searching for guerrilla leader Capt. Umbaugh. He was found and killed.

On May 30-31, 1862, the largest number of troops who entered Wardensville during the war — almost 20,000 men under Gen. John C. Frémont — marched by in a steady rain. Frémont and his men were returning to the Shenandoah Valley, from which Confederate Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson had driven them earlier in the month, to face him again (and again suffer defeat) at Cross Keys and Port Republic on June 8-9.

Confederate Gen. John D. Imboden's men unsuccessfully attacked a Union supply train moving through here on December 22, 1862, on its way to Winchester with provisions for Gen. Gustave P. Cluseret. Federal forces had recently destroyed Imboden's camp near Moorefield, and he was gathering provisions for the winter.

On August 5, 1863, Union Gen. William W. Averell led a column of cavalry and artillery through town. He was beginning a raid to destroy gunpowder and salt works in Pocahontas and Greenbrier Counties. Several times during the war, Confederate Capt. John Hansen McNeill led his
Three Markers in Wardensville image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, May 30, 2010
2. Three Markers in Wardensville
Behind them is Main Street and the cemetery.
Rangers through Wardensville to attack union forces in the Shenandoah Valley to the east.

Across the road from you is the Wardensville Cemetery. At least twenty-eight Confederate soldiers and one Union soldier are buried here.

"The citizens of Wardensville were warned that they would be held strictly accountable for any future demonstrations of guerrilla warfare, and plainly informed that they only way in which they could save their houses from conflagration was for them to defend their territory against incursions of all lawless bands of guerrillas."
— Col. Stephen W. Downey, 3rd Maryland Infantry, US.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 4.803′ N, 78° 35.528′ W. Marker is in Wardensville, West Virginia, in Hardy County. Marker is on Main Street (U.S. 48), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. This portion of Route 48 is also WV 55. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 East Main Street, Wardensville WV 26851, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Wardensville (here, next to this marker); Population Center
General John C. Fremont image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, May 30, 2010
3. General John C. Fremont
Pictured on the Marker
(here, next to this marker); Lost and Found (approx. 3.5 miles away); West Virginia / Virginia (approx. 4.2 miles away); Capon Springs (approx. 6.3 miles away); Capon Lake Whipple Truss Bridge (approx. 6.3 miles away); Oriskany Sand (approx. 7.4 miles away); Frederick County / Shenandoah County (approx. 8.9 miles away in Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Wardensville.
 
More about this marker. Marker stands between two older historical markers. They are at the Visitor Center.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Captain John H. McNeill image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, May 30, 2010
4. Captain John H. McNeill
As Seen on the Marker
A Wagon Train Raid image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, May 30, 2010
5. A Wagon Train Raid
Illustration from Harper's Weekly shown on the Marker
Cemetery Mentioned on the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, May 30, 2010
6. Cemetery Mentioned on the Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Linda Walcroft of Strasburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 990 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Linda Walcroft of Strasburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Linda Walcroft of Strasburg, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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