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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Middle Bridge
 
Middle Bridge Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. Middle Bridge Marker
 
Inscription. This is the location of the famous "Middle Bridge," one of three bridges involved with the Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862. The upper (Hitt) bridge and lower (Burnside) bridge are still standing. This three-arch stone bridge was destroyed by flooding in 1889.
 
Erected by Washington County Historical Advisory Committee.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland, Washington County Historical Advisory Committee marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.872′ N, 77° 43.583′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Boonsboro Pike (State Highway 34), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located on the west end of the modern Boonsboro Pike bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 4th and 12th U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); The Newcomer House (within shouting distance of this marker); Heart of the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Early's Washington Raid (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gettysburg Campaign (about 300 feet away); 1862 Antietam Campaign (about 300 feet away); Third Indiana Cavalry (about 500 feet away); Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Middle Bridge Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2013
2. Middle Bridge Marker
 

 
Regarding Middle Bridge. Middle Bridge has also been called Porter's Bridge in reference to Major General Fitz John Porter, commanding the Federal V Corps which crossed the Antietam here.
 
Also see . . .  Stone Arch Bridges of Washington County Maryland. (Submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Marker on the Antietam Battlefield Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2013
3. Marker on the Antietam Battlefield
The Newcomer Barn can be seen behind the marker.
 
 
Middle Bridge Marker at the West End of Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
4. Middle Bridge Marker at the West End of Bridge
 
 
Modern Replacement for Middle Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
5. Modern Replacement for Middle Bridge
 
 
Antietam Bridge on the Sharpsburg-Boonsboro Turnpike - The Middle Bridge Photo, Click for full size
Library of Congress
6. Antietam Bridge on the Sharpsburg-Boonsboro Turnpike - The Middle Bridge
Photograph of the bridge as it appeared during the battle of Antietam, credited to Alexander Gardner. Most likely this image was taken shortly after the battle when Gardner was also collecting some of his most famous photographs. The angle of this photo is difficult to reconcile with other wartime photos and the lay of the land. However, the Library of Congress denotes this bridge as the Middle Bridge where the Boonesboro Pike crossed the creek.
[Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0128]
 
 
Middle Bridge Photo, Click for full size
7. Middle Bridge
Another view of the Middle Bridge this one looking over the bridge to the west (toward the battlefield). Notice the bridge's abutments, with the side closest to the camera having an extension. The Newcomber Barn is just in frame to the left.

[From the Gardner Collection of the National Park Service, sourced through Wikipedia]
 
 
The "Antietam Bridge" Photo, Click for full size
8. The "Antietam Bridge"
This wartime photo of the bridge titled "Antietam Bridge," also appears to show the Middle Bridge, this time looking from the high ridge just east of the crossing point. If the placement of the photographer is correct, this view looks to the northwest toward the area of the modern day Observation Tower on the Sunken Lane. The abutments are similar to those in the photo above, but the photographer carefully kept other placemarks out of frame!

(Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0129, Call Number LC-B811- 608)
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,738 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on August 15, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on October 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8. submitted on December 7, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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