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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fayetteville in Lincoln County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Confederate Park

 
 
Confederate Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
1. Confederate Park Marker
Inscription. Confederate Park, the northeast corner of the courthouse yard, was deeded to the Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, by the Quarterly Court. The chapter unveiled the Confederate Monument on September 6, 1906. Standing tall, facing north with a commanding view of the two cannons, the Confederate private at parade rest has a frank and fearless look. The statue was made in Carrara, Italy. Mr. Lewis Peach, a Confederate veteran of Lincoln County, erected the monument. The pedestal is of white Georgia marble and the base is of Bedford Stone.
 
Erected by Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter, U.D.C.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 35° 9.1′ N, 86° 34.167′ W. Marker is in Fayetteville, Tennessee, in Lincoln County. Marker is at the intersection of Elk Avenue South and College Street East (Business U.S. 64), on the left when traveling north on Elk Avenue South. Click for map. Park is located on the northeast corner of the Lincoln County courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Fayetteville TN 37334, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Confederate Park Cannon
Confederate Park image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
2. Confederate Park
Marker describing the park is located on the west side of the monument (to the right in this view). The cannons are Civil War era 10-inch Rodman guns. In post-war years, both weapons were converted to rifled guns by adding an 8-inch caliber sleeve into the original smooth bore.
(here, next to this marker); Lincoln County in the Civil War (here, next to this marker); Martyred (a few steps from this marker); Bell's Route Trail of Tears (within shouting distance of this marker); Women of the Confederacy (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp Blount (approx. 0.7 miles away); Andrew Jackson (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named Camp Blount (approx. 1.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fayetteville.
 
Additional comments.
1. Related markers
There are several other 'roadside'-type markers describing the various items associated with the park. They are found as individual submittals on the database.
    — Submitted June 22, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Confederate Soldiers Monument image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
3. Confederate Soldiers Monument
North face - "The carven stone is here to tell to all the world the love we bear to those who fought, and bled, and fell. Whose battle cry was do and dare. Who feared no foe, but faced the fray. Our gallant men who wore the gray. A tribute from the Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter U.D.C."
Confederate Soldiers monument image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
4. Confederate Soldiers monument
East face - "Preserve the truth in history."
Confederate Soldiers monument image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
5. Confederate Soldiers monument
South face - "1861-1865 In loving memory of the three thousand Confederate soldiers of Lincoln County whose patriotism and heroism are held in perpetual remembrance. Crest to crest they bore our banner, side by side they fell asleep. Hand to hand we rear this token, Heart to heart we kneel and weep."
Confederate Soldiers monument image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
6. Confederate Soldiers monument
West face - "In perpetual remembrance"
Confederate Soldiers monument image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 12, 2010
7. Confederate Soldiers monument
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 788 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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