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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sullivans Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

10-Inch Columbiad, Rifled and Banded

 
 
10-Inch Columbiad, Rifled and Banded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
1. 10-Inch Columbiad, Rifled and Banded Marker
Inscription. Captured by Confederates at Fort Sumter in 1861, this weapon was later repaired and rifled by Eason Brothers of Charleston. With an iron band and brass trunions, it presents an unique appearance. This weapon returned to service at Battery Bee on Sullivan's Island near the end of 1863.

Maximum Range: 5650 yards (5166 M)
 
Location. 32° 45.533′ N, 79° 51.401′ W. Marker is in Sullivans Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Poe Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located in the cannon walk, stop eight, on the tour of Fort Moultrie. Marker is in this post office area: Sullivans Island SC 29482, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 7-Inch Brooke Rifle, Triple Banded (here, next to this marker); 10-Inch Columbiad (Rodman) (a few steps from this marker); 8-inch Parrott (200 Pounder) (a few steps from this marker); 10-Inch Confederate Columbiad (a few steps from this marker); 10-Inch Parrott (300 pounder) (a few steps from this marker); 13-Inch Seacoast Mortar (a few steps from this marker); Buoyant Mine (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Armament (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sullivans Island.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
10-Inch Columbiad and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
2. 10-Inch Columbiad and Marker
On the breech face is the number 15210 indicating the weight in pounds when originally produced. The marking "J.M.E. & Bro." appears on the band added by J.M. Eason & Company. In the breech face are slots for the ratchet elevation mechanism used for this Columbiad.
Profile of Modified 10-inch Columbiad image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
3. Profile of Modified 10-inch Columbiad
Originally cast as a smoothbore in 1846 by Cyrus Alger & Co., of Boston, Massachusetts, the columbiad was among the weapons which defended Fort Sumter at the start of the war. Damaged, either by the bombardment of the fort or by mishandling, the cannon was rendered useless by the loss of a trunnion.
Trunnion Face image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
4. Trunnion Face
As indicated by the stamp, in 1863 the Eason Brothers works in Charleston modified the columbiad. First rifling the piece to improve accuracy and range, the Eason brothers then added a reinforcing band. To replace the broken trunnion, the Easons added a bronze hoop. Long bolts attached to a breech plate held the hoop in place.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 762 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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