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Cave City in Barren County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Morgan's Cave City Raid

 
 
Morgan's Cave City Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Trinket Troy, April 25, 2006
1. Morgan's Cave City Raid Marker
Inscription. On May 11, 1862 Col. John Hunt Morgan and his advance guard seized the Cave City depot and captured the next train that stopped. Morgan's entire command arrived shortly thereafter. Morgan's troops proceeded to destroy the train; four passenger cars, a locomotive, and forty-five freight cars. The firebox was filled with wood and set on fire. The Confederates then fired each car and sent the train racing down the tracks toward Bowling Green. Morgan remembered "It was a grand sight, that burning train going at head long speed to destruction." For weeks passengers going through Cave City gazed in amazement at the scene where the locomotive had exploded. For a hundred yards on both sides of the track, the underbrush and grass were burned, trees were torn out by their roots, and wreckage was scattered on the ground.

The next day at noon, guards north of Cave City heard a passenger train approaching, bound for Nashville from Louisville. Morgan's men blocked the tracks, stopping the train while other troops threw logs on the tracks behind the train, preventing a reverse run. Morgan confiscated $6,000 in cash from the express agent and captured two Union officers and several enlisted men. He then allowed the train to return to Louisville safely. Stories of the Cave City Raid and its success took on the trappings of a romantic
Civil War Markers / Interpretive Signs Along Broadway Street image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2016
2. Civil War Markers / Interpretive Signs Along Broadway Street
Morgan's Cave City Raid marker is the second from the bottom marker
saga of chivalry due to the way Morgan treated the train's female passengers. "I have no right to look into ladies baggage, or to examine their trunks. Southern gentlemen do no such thing" Morgan is reported as saying.

Col. John Hunt Morgan. After Morgan's defeat in Lebanon, Tennessee he set out on a brief raid into Kentucky to the Green River country, where he began his military career. He found Bowling Green was to well guarded, so he rode north to Cave City.

Gen. George W. Morgan. After Morgan's Cave City Raid, Union Gen. George W. Morgan deployed infantry to guard trains and stations in Central Kentucky. (George W. and John Hunt Morgan are not related.)
 
Erected by Kentucky Heartlands Civil War Trails Commission. (Marker Number 4a.)
 
Location. 37° 8.329′ N, 85° 57.562′ W. Marker is in Cave City, Kentucky, in Barren County. Marker is at the intersection of W. Broadway Street (State Highway 70) and N. 1st Street, on the right when traveling west on W. Broadway Street. Click for map. Marker is at the railroad tracks. Marker is in this post office area: Cave City KY 42127, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cave City Raid (here, next to this marker);
Civil War Markers / Interpretive Signs at Roy Dickey Reynolds Park image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2016
3. Civil War Markers / Interpretive Signs at Roy Dickey Reynolds Park
Morgan's Cave City Raid marker is center right
General Joseph H. Lewis (here, next to this marker); Gen. Joseph H. Lewis (here, next to this marker); Lt. Charles Moran - USAF (approx. 4 miles away); Unknown Confederate Soldier Monument (approx. 4.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Cave City.
 
More about this marker. One of a series of John Morgan Hunt Heritage Trail in Kentucky markers.
 
Regarding Morgan's Cave City Raid. The trains Morgan raided were Louisville and Nashville (L&N) trains.
 
Also see . . .
1. 4a - Morgan's Cave City Raid. Marker's page on the John Hunt Morgan in Kentucky Heritage Trail site. (Submitted on April 30, 2006.) 

2. A Brief History of The Louisville & Nashville Railroad. by Charles B. Castner on the L&N Historical Society Site. (Submitted on April 30, 2006.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Trinket Troy of Burke, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,527 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Trinket Troy of Burke, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on August 10, 2016.
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