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Quartzsite in La Paz County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
The Last Camp of Hi Jolly
Camel Driver, Packer, Scout
 
The Last Camp of Hi Jolly Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Denise Boose, June 16, 2011
1. The Last Camp of Hi Jolly Marker
 
Inscription.
Last Camp
of
Hi Jolly
Born somewhere in Syria
about 1828
Died at Quartzsite
December 16, 1902
Came to this country
February 10, 1856
Camel Driver - Packer
Scout - Over Thirty
Years a faithful aid
to the US Government

 
Erected 1935 by Arizona Highway Department.
 
Location. 33° 39.864′ N, 114° 14.202′ W. Marker is in Quartzsite, Arizona, in La Paz County. Marker can be reached from Cemetery Street (Business U.S. 10) 0.1 miles north of West Main Street (U.S. 95) when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Quartzsite AZ 85346, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hi Jolly (within shouting distance of this marker); Tyson's Well (approx. one mile away); Oasis Hotel Site (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Tyson's Well (approx. one mile away); Quinn Pass (approx. 13.3 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. A series of markers related to the Army's camel experiment
 
Also see . . .
1. Hi Jolly and the US Camel Corps. Lt. Edward Fitzgerald Beale, for whom Beale’s Cut in Newhall would later be named, led the U.S. Camel Corps on an expedition from Arizona to California in 1857. After the U.S. Army abandoned the short-lived experiment, Beale, who attained the rank of General, used some of the camels as pack animals to carry supplies from Los Angeles to his base at Fort Tejon — passing through the Santa Clarita Valley and, presumably, Beale's Cut, along the way. (Submitted on December 12, 2009, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.) 
 
Hi Jolly's (Haiji Ali's?) Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Thomas Chris English, December 11, 2009
2. Hi Jolly's (Haiji Ali's?) Monument
 

2. The Great Southwestern Desert Camel Experiment. It was during the 19th century that the camel, of all creatures, became a part of the fabled story of the deserts of the Southwest. The animal’s history in the United States, however, began far earlier, in 1701, when a wealthy sea captain named Crowninshield brought a male and female to Salem, Massachusetts, where he exhibited them as curiosities. A few other camels were imported for exhibition over the next century and a half. (Submitted on December 12, 2009, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.) 

3. Hi Jolly - Wikipedia. This Wikipedia article reports the history of Hi Jolly as well as displaying photos of the site and Hi Jolly. (Submitted on December 12, 2009, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.) 
 
The Last Camp of Hi Jolly Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Thomas Chris English, December 11, 2009
3. The Last Camp of Hi Jolly Marker
 
 
The Hi Jolly Cemetery, Quartsite, AZ Photo, Click for full size
By Thomas Chris English, December 11, 2009
4. The Hi Jolly Cemetery, Quartsite, AZ
[See Link #4 for information on the Legend of The Red Ghost.]

Legend
The camel atop the Pyramid symbolizes the legend of The Red Ghost that roamed the desert, terrorizing man and beast with what amounted to a corpse tied to his back.

Legend also has it that the ashes of Topsy, Hi Jolly’s favorite camel and companion are also placed in the bronze time capsule.
 
 
Historical Background Sign Photo, Click for full size
By Thomas Chris English, December 11, 2009
5. Historical Background Sign
Hi Jolly
The famous camel herd with which the name of Hi Jolly is linked constitutes an interesting sidelight of Arizona history….
Jefferson Davis (afterward President of the Southern Confederacy). As Secretary of War. Approved a plan to experiment with camels for freighting and communication in the arid Southwest….Major Henry C. Wayne of the U.S. Army and Lt. D.D. Porter (later a distinguished admiral in the Civil War) visited the Levant with the storeship “Supply” and procurred 33 camels which were landed at Indianola, Texas. February 10, 1856. 41 were added on a second voyage….
With the first camels came. As caretaker, Haiji Ali whose Arabic name was promptly changed to “Hi Jolly” by the soldiers. And by this name he became universally known. His Greek (?) name was Philip Tedro….On the Beale Expedition in 1857 to open a wagon road across Arizona from Fort Defiance to California. The camels under Hi Jolly’s charge. Proved their worth. Nevertheless, the War Department abandoned the experiment and the camels were left on the Arizona desert to shift for themselves. Chiefly roaming this particular section. They survived for many years creating interest and excitement …. Officially the camel experiment was a failure. But both Lt. Beale and Major Wayne were enthusiastic in praise of the animals. A fair trail might have resulted in a complete success.
 
 
The Last Camp of Hi Jolly Marker & Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Denise Boose, June 16, 2011
6. The Last Camp of Hi Jolly Marker & Monument
 
 
Camel Saddle Photo, Click for full size
By Denise Boose, June 16, 2011
7. Camel Saddle
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 12, 2009, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. This page has been viewed 1,984 times since then. Last updated on June 23, 2010, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. Photos:   1. submitted on June 9, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 12, 2009, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.   6, 7. submitted on June 9, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
 
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