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Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Common Sense”

 
 
“Common Sense” Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
1. “Common Sense” Marker
Inscription. At his print shop here, Robert Bell published the first edition of Thomas Paine’s revolutionary pamphlet in January 1776. Arguing for a republican form of government under a written constitution, it played a key role in rallying American support for independence.
 
Erected 1993 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 39° 56.79′ N, 75° 8.787′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is at the intersection of South 3rd Street and Thomas Paine Place, on the left when traveling north on South 3rd Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 12 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Home of Juan de Miralles (within shouting distance of this marker); The Home of John Penn (within shouting distance of this marker); The House of Samuel Powel (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); “Evangeline” (about 300 feet away); Old St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church (about 400 feet away); Philadelphia Exchange (about 400 feet away); Old St. Joseph's
“Common Sense” Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
2. “Common Sense” Marker
(about 500 feet away); Todd House (about 500 feet away); The Philadelphia Contributionship (about 500 feet away); Fraunces Tavern (about 500 feet away); James Madison 4th President lived here (about 500 feet away); A Working-Class House in the Capital City (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Common Sense. “ ‘Common Sense’ was first published anonymously by Thomas Paine in January of 1776 and is regarded by many as the most important piece of writing of the American Revolution. Although dissent among the colonists was growing over the British government’s newly levied taxes and customs duties and the bloody battle at Concord, there was still talk of reconciliation among the colonists. However, Paine’s convincing arguments against the monarchy and British domination spread like wildfire throughout the colonies and turned the public tide toward independence. General George Washington wrote to a friend in Massachusetts: ‘I find that “Common Sense” is working a powerful change there in the minds of many men. Few pamphlets
Location of Print Shop and “Common Sense” Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
3. Location of Print Shop and “Common Sense” Marker
Print shop is now a parking lot.
have had so dramatic an effect on political events’.” (Submitted on June 25, 2010.) 

2. Common Sense - Behind the Marker. ExplorePAHistory.com (Submitted on July 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 

3. Thomas Paine at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on July 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 828 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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