“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Asheville in Buncombe County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)

Trinity Episcopal Church

Built 1911 - 1913

Trinity Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 22, 2010
1. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker
Designed by Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue
Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson, New York
Has been placed on the
National Register
Of Historic Places

By the United States
Department of the Interior

Location. 35° 35.576′ N, 82° 33.17′ W. Marker is in Asheville, North Carolina, in Buncombe County. Marker is on Aston Street near Church Street, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Trinity Episcopal Church stands on the southeastern corner of Church and Aston streets. Marker is in this post office area: Asheville NC 28801, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hotel District (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Immortal Image (about 600 feet away); O. Henry (about 600 feet away); Stepping Out (about 700 feet away); Elizabeth Blackwell, M.D. (about 700 feet away); The Early Years In Asheville's Historic Central Square (approx. 0.2 miles away); Robert E. Lee (approx. 0.2 miles away); Walk Into History (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Asheville.
Regarding Trinity Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church in Downtown Asheville Since 1849 -

Trinity Church is a nurturing Christian community
Trinity Episcopal Church and Marker along Aston Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 22, 2010
2. Trinity Episcopal Church and Marker along Aston Street
Nationally known architect Bertram Goodhue of the New York-based firm of Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson designed the building in 1912. The Tudor Gothic Revival style brick building with granite trim features a simple, gable-roofed sanctuary with transepts and a short corner tower. The interior opens to an attractive hammer beam ceiling and panel tracery fills the stained glass windows. A compatible parish house and hall were added later around the church.
providing opportunities for worship, spiritual growth and commitment in a supportive and open atmosphere.

In 1847, Asheville was a small community of about 800 people. Biltmore Avenue, then called Main Street, was still a dirt road. The closest established Episcopal Church was in Rutherfordton, and circuit riders were few and far between. Three women - Henrietta Patton, Salena Corpening Roberts and Ann Evelina Baird Coleman - approached Bishop Ives, asking him to send a minister to Asheville to start a church. Jarvis Buxton responded to the call, and Trinity Church was born.

Initially, services were held in buildings around town, but by 1849, property had been donated and the first church building was erected on this site, at the corner of Church and Aston Streets. The congregation quickly outgrew the first church and a second was built in its place. That building tragically burned in the fall of 1910, but the third, and present, church was begun the next year. Over the years, members of Trinity helped found Mission Hospital, build Asheville's public library and initiate various educational opportunities for mountain children. Parishioners stepped forward to act as godparents for orphans and children of unchurched mill workers, and then made sure they had enough to eat and taught them to read. Public leaders, home makers, physicians, attorneys and business owners, movers and shakers, community activists and volunteers, all have called Trinity home. And, over the years, they have reached out to the community with energy, vision and talents to improve the lives of those who have touched theirs.

For over 150 years, Trinity has been instrumental in the growth of Episcopal churches in Asheville and the surrounding area, with local missions having found their initial support and inspiration from this congregation. As a result, Trinity is central to the history and formation of the Diocese of Western North Carolina, and today continues to offer a guiding hand in the journey of faith within the church and within the community at large. (Trinity Episcopal Church)
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable Buildings
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 618 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement