Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square

White House Conference Center

 
 
Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 21, 2010
1. Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square Marker
Inscription.
[Sketch of townhouses along Jackson Place, NW - the western border of Lafayette Square - behind which the White House Conference Center was constructed in the 1960s & 70s.]

Dedicated to those whose spirit and vision helped to preserve the historic architecture of Lafayette Square.

Grosvenor Chapman, Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and Vice-Chairman of the Committee of 100 on the Federal City, in 1961 provided a sketch reproduced here that indicated a radically new vision for the development the Square

David Finley, Founding Director of the National Gallery of Art, Chairman of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, and friend and advisor to Jacqueline Kennedy, successfully opposed several plans for the Square that would have swept away the historic architectural context.

Charles Glover, Jr., eminent banker, member of the Committee of 100, and childhood resident of the Square, shared with Grosvenor Chapman the concept of the sketch.

William Walton, correspondent and artist, and close friend and advisor to the Kennedys, presented the sketch to the President and First Lady, receiving their enthusiastic endorsement.

This sketch so impressed Jacqueline Kennedy that she became its chief advocate. The principles it evoked became the basis for the historic
Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
2. Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square Marker
White House Conference Center
restoration of the Square.
 
Location. 38° 53.974′ N, 77° 2.304′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Jackson Place, NW south of H Street, NW. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 726 Jackson Place, NW, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Decatur House (within shouting distance of this marker); Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (within shouting distance of this marker); Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (within shouting distance of this marker); Francis Preston Blair (within shouting distance of this marker); The Blair House (within shouting distance of this marker); In Honor of Leslie Coffelt (within shouting distance of this marker); Baron von Steuben Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lee House (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Downtown.
 
Also see . . .
1. President's Park: Lafayette Square. (Submitted on May 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. White House Conference Center. (Submitted on May 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. historic preservation; urban development;
Andrew Jackson Statue (by sculptor Clark Mills, 1853) centerpiece of Lafayette Square image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 21, 2010
3. Andrew Jackson Statue (by sculptor Clark Mills, 1853) centerpiece of Lafayette Square
- directly east of the "Restoration..." Marker.
Andrew Jackson; President's Park; National Park Service.

 
Categories. GovernmentLandmarksNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 906 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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