Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Raleigh in Wake County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

North Carolina Museum of History

 
 
North Carolina Museum of History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
1. North Carolina Museum of History Marker
Inscription. Collection gathered by Fred Olds merged 1902 with state's artifacts to create Hall of History. Moved here in 1994.
 
Erected 2003 by North Carolina Office of Archives and History. (Marker Number H 48.)
 
Location. 35° 46.94′ N, 78° 38.286′ W. Marker is in Raleigh, North Carolina, in Wake County. Marker is at the intersection of North Wilmington Street and Edenton Street, on the left when traveling north on North Wilmington Street. Click for map. The North Carolina Museum of History is located at 5 East Edenton Street in Raleigh North Carolina. The marker is located on Wilmington Street, beside the museum. Marker is in this post office area: Raleigh NC 27601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Just Like the Liberty Bell (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Day (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolina State Library (within shouting distance of this marker); N.C. Division of Archives & History (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Blakely Cannon (about 400 feet away); Medical Society of North Carolina
North Carolina Museum of History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 6, 2013
2. North Carolina Museum of History Marker
(about 500 feet away); North Carolina State Capitol (about 500 feet away); North Carolina (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Raleigh.
 
Also see . . .  NC Museum of History Website. (Submitted on July 2, 2010, by Paul Jordan of Burlington, N. C., U. S. A..)
 
Categories. 20th CenturyEducation
 
North Carolina Museum of History image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
3. North Carolina Museum of History
The view from Jones Street
North Carolina Museum of History image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
4. North Carolina Museum of History
Frederick Augustus Olds Statue image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
5. Frederick Augustus Olds Statue
One of three statues on the steps of the History Museum. The marker reads: Frederick Augustus Olds (1853 - 1935) Colonel Fred Olds founded the Hall of History, now the North Carolina Museum of History, in 1902. He devoted his life to preserving the state's heritage. In memory of Dellie Hardison Smith, a creative planner for this North Carolina Museum of History building.
Statue of a Sauratown Woman image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
6. Statue of a Sauratown Woman
One of three statues on the steps of the History Museum. The marker reads: Sauratown Woman (late 1600s) Sculptor's representation of a Saura Indian woman who lived along the Dan River in present-day Stokes County. The adorned deerskin dress and hood suggest a high status in the tribe. In memory of Dellie Hardison Smith, past president of the North Carolina Museum of History Associates, Inc.
Thomas Day Statue image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
7. Thomas Day Statue
One of three statues on the steps of the History Museum. The marker reads: Thomas Day (1801-ca. 1861) Sculptor's representation of Thomas Day, a free African American in Caswell County who created fashionable furniture and architectural elements before the Civil War. In memory of Dellie Hardison Smith, dedicated leader of North Carolina arts and humanities.
Replica of the Liberty Bell in front of the North Carolina Museum of History image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, July 2, 2010
8. Replica of the Liberty Bell in front of the North Carolina Museum of History
Marker reads: Just Like the Liberty Bell This exact replica of the Liberty Bell is the same size, weight, and material as the original. Therefore, it has the same tone that the Liberty Bell would have if it could be rung. This bell, cast in France, weighs 2,080 pounds. It is 85 percent copper and three feet tall from lip to crown. The bell has a twelve-foot circumference and measures three inches thick at the lip. The U.S. Department of the Treasury presented the bell to North Carolina in 1950. It is one of over fifty replica bells that America's copper industry has donated to encourage participation in the Independence Savings Bond Program. Donation, United States Department of the Treasury
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Paul Jordan of Burlington, N. C., U. S. A.. This page has been viewed 1,138 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Paul Jordan of Burlington, N. C., U. S. A..   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Paul Jordan of Burlington, N. C., U. S. A.. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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