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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Richmond in Chesterfield County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Falling Creek Iron Works

1619-1622

 
 
Falling Creek Iron Works Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 3, 2010
1. Falling Creek Iron Works Marker
Inscription. Vanished now but for a trace, Falling Creek is the site of the first industrial ironworks in the New World. The close proximity of iron ore, wood for fuel and power provided by the falling water made the Falling Creek site perfect for this development. In 1619, the Virginia Company sent artisans to the colony to set up the industry, but it was not until 1621 that the blast furnace was in place and ready for use, with an initial shipment of iron to England planned for April 1622. The ironworks were, however, destroyed on March 22, 1622, during the first Powhatan Indian uprising, and the iron was never shipped.

Three unsuccessful attempts to rebuild the site followed. In 1750, Archibald Cary built a forge, and iron was once again worked at Falling Creek. This operation was destroyed in 1781 by British forces under the command of Benedict Arnold. The forge was replaced by the Ampthill Gristmill, after the conclusion of the American Revolution. This facility operated until 1906, when the site ceased all activity.

Here at Falling Creek, hopes were unleashed, battles fought, and unrealized dreams gradually faded. The Failing Creek Park and interpretive center will be a tribute to those who struggled at this tiny outpost, where the sound of industry was first heard.
 
Erected by
Good Friday Massacre at Falling Creek Iron Works in 1622. image. Click for full size.
July 3, 2010
2. Good Friday Massacre at Falling Creek Iron Works in 1622.
Falling Creek Ironworks Foundation, Chesterfield Heritage Alliance.
 
Location. 37° 26.254′ N, 77° 26.313′ W. Marker is near Richmond, Virginia, in Chesterfield County. Marker is at the intersection of Jefferson Davis Highway (U.S. 1) and Marina Drive, on the right when traveling north on Jefferson Davis Highway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond VA 23237, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Falling Creek Ironworks (within shouting distance of this marker); Warwick (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of First Iron Foundry in America (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Drewry’s Bluff (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Drewry’s Bluff (approx. ¾ mile away); Ampthill Estate (approx. 0.9 miles away); Camp Beall (approx. 1.3 miles away); Fort Darling (approx. 1.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a photo with the caption, "The falls at Falling Creek provided the power needed for the production of iron." On the right is "Art depicting the attack on the ironworks in the 1622 Good Friday Massacre."
 
Also see . . .
1. Falling Creek Ironworks Foundation
Falling Creek is at the foot of the hill. image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 3, 2010
3. Falling Creek is at the foot of the hill.
. (Submitted on July 3, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. Falling Creek Ironworks. Chesterfield Heritage Alliance (Submitted on July 3, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceNative AmericansNotable PlacesSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 886 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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