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Harding in Morris County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sons of Saint Patrick

The Irish at Jockey Hollow

 

—Morristown National Historical Park —

 
Sons of Saint Patrick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2010
1. Sons of Saint Patrick Marker
Inscription. Saint Patrick’s Day, March 17, 1780 was “ . . . ushered in with Music and the hoisting of Colours, exhibiting the 13 Stripes, the favorite Harp, and an Inscription, declaring in Capitals, THE INDEPENDENCE OF IRELAND.” – The New-York Gazette and the Weekly Mercury; April 24, 1780

Irishmen fought on both sides of the American Revolution.

For the British, they fought in battles from Maine to Georgia as members of the Royal Irish Artillery, the Queen’s Rangers and the Volunteers of Ireland.

However, the largest number of Irishmen served in the American Army. Seven out of the eleven brigades in Jockey Hollow were commanded by generals born in Ireland or who had Irish parents. It is estimated that one quarter of the entire Continental Army was from Ireland. In some regiments from Pennsylvania and Maryland, almost half of the soldiers were Irish. The Irish were so numerous in the Pennsylvania Line that General Henry Lee (“Light Horse Harry”) of Virginia referred to it as the “Line of Ireland.”

St. Patrick’s Day was one holiday General Washington granted the army in Jockey Hollow during the hard winter of 1779-1780. He hoped that by recognizing the Irish holiday it might further political unrest in Ireland.

General Washington ordered all work parties to
Marker in Morristown National Historical Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2010
2. Marker in Morristown National Historical Park
Soldier huts are visible at the top of the hill behind the marker.
cease for the day. In the New York Brigade the officers were told “not to detail for duty any sons of St. Patrick.” Colonel Johnson, commanding the Second Pennsylvania Brigade, bought a large barrel of rum for his men, though he expected them to “conduct themselves with the greatest sobriety and good order.”

Funding for this wayside was provided by the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick of Morris County, the Irish American Cultural Institute.
 
Location. 40° 46.484′ N, 74° 32.251′ W. Marker is in Harding, New Jersey, in Morris County. Marker is on Grand Parade Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in Morristown National Historical Park, along the tour road. Marker is in this post office area: Morristown NJ 07960, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Pennsylvania Line (within shouting distance of this marker); Settling in (within shouting distance of this marker); A Revolutionary Winter (within shouting distance of this marker); Continental Army Encampment at Morristown (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Soldier’s Hut [Replica] (about 500 feet away); Officer’s Hut [Replica]
Morristown Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2010
3. Morristown Markers
Several markers are located at the Pennsylvania Brigade encampment site in Morristown National Historical Park. The Sons of Saint Patrick marker is the newest one.
(about 500 feet away); A heritage of hearths (approx. 0.2 miles away); Inspections (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Harding.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains an illustration of soldiers around a campfire by artist Donald Trojani and from the National Park Service/Harpers Ferry Center Commissioned Art Collection.
The right of the marker features a picture of the “Independence of Ireland” flag mentioned on the marker. It has a caption of “Flag possibly created for Saint Patrick’s Day, 1780. Flag’s design based on a contemporary source (see opening quote), and probably a modification of an already existing regimental flag.”
Below this is a picture of a Clay pipe with Irish harp and shamrocks and has the caption “Image based on archeological fragment found in Jockey Hollow and now part of Morristown National Historical Park’s museum collection (MORR 8911). Actual pipe bowl approximately 1” high.” Flag and pipe artist: Mark de Mos.
 
Also see . . .  Morristown National Historical Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on July 5, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Irish Pipe on Display image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, December 12, 2009
4. Irish Pipe on Display
The Clay pipe with the Irish harp and shamrocks mentioned on the marker is on display at the Jockey Hollow Visitor Center. It can be seen here at the upper right of the photo.
 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 857 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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