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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chimayo in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Chimayo

 
 
Chimayo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, July 1, 2010
1. Chimayo Marker
Inscription. Indians occupied the Chimayo valley centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. The village of Chimayo, founded in the early 18th century, shortly after the reconquest of New Mexico, has been a center of the Spanish weaving tradition for over 250 years. The village retains the historical pattern of settlement around a defensible plaza.
 
Erected by New Mexico Historic Preservation Division and Department of Highways.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro marker series.
 
Location. 36° 0.11′ N, 105° 55.782′ W. Marker is in Chimayo, New Mexico, in Rio Arriba County. Marker is on Juan Medina Road (County Road 98) 0.1 miles east of High Road to Taos (State Road 76), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. This is a pull-out, NM 76 can be seen to the northwest, Ortega's Weaving Shop is across the street. Marker is in this post office area: Chimayo NM 87522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Santuario de Chimayó (approx. 0.9 miles away); Cordova (approx. 1.9 miles away but has been reported missing); Truchas (approx. 6.2 miles away);
Chimayo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, July 1, 2010
2. Chimayo Marker
Looking northeast
Santa Cruz de la Cañada / Santa Cruz Plaza on the Camino Real (approx. 6.6 miles away); The St. Francis Women's Club (approx. 7 miles away); Truchas Peaks (approx. 7.5 miles away); Chimayo Trading Post / Trujillo House (approx. 7.8 miles away); Esther Martinez - P’oe Tsáwäˀ (1912-2006) (approx. 8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chimayo.
 
More about this marker. Unlike the marker down the road, this one does not accent the last syllable of Chimayó. David Pike's entry for this marker in his 2004 book Roadside New Mexico does.
 
Also see . . .
1. A Chimayo Community Web Page. (Submitted on July 13, 2010, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.)
2. History of Chimayo. Web page providing a good overview of the history of the area. (Submitted on October 31, 2013, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Chimayo Marker - Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, July 1, 2010
3. Chimayo Marker - Reverse
New Mexico Historic Marker Maps The state's Official Scenic Historic Markers usually have a map on the reverse side showing the location of more local markers. For the ardent historical marker seeker, these maps are a mine of information, waiting for extraction.
Chimayo Marker - Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, July 1, 2010
4. Chimayo Marker - Reverse
Looking northwest toward New Mexico 76 - the High Road to Taos
Chimayo Marker - Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, July 1, 2010
5. Chimayo Marker - Reverse
Looking due west past the marker.
Chimayo Marker - Lies Beyond the Blooming Cholla Cactus image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, July 1, 2010
6. Chimayo Marker - Lies Beyond the Blooming Cholla Cactus
This is just how it looked the day this picture was taken. No changed-up camera settings, no lightness/contrast manipulations. I just couldn't quite get the marker and catch the blooming cactus too.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. This page has been viewed 782 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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