Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Keyser in Mineral County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Keyser / Averell’s Raid

 
 
Keyser Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 5, 2010
1. Keyser Face of Marker
Inscription. Keyser. Between 1861–1865, Keyser, then New Creek, was sought by the North and South. It changed hands fourteen times. Fort Fuller, where Potomac State Collect stands, was supported by a series of forts girding the town.

Averell’s Raid. Here in 1863 General W. W. Averell started the Federal cavalry raid to Salem, Virginia, and then back into this State. This is among the great exploits of the War. Many of his troopers were from West Virginia.
 
Erected 1980 by West Virginia Department of Culture and History.
 
Location. 39° 26.37′ N, 78° 58.599′ W. Marker is in Keyser, West Virginia, in Mineral County. Marker is at the intersection of East Piedmont Street and North Davis Street, on the right when traveling north on East Piedmont Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Keyser WV 26726, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Potomac State College (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Keyser / Averell’s Raid
Averell’s Raid Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 5, 2010
2. Averell’s Raid Face of Marker
(approx. 0.8 miles away); Washington’s Host (approx. 3.8 miles away); Mayo and Savage (approx. 4.7 miles away); Don Redman (approx. 4.8 miles away); Working Together for the Community (approx. 5 miles away in Maryland); Vandiver - Trout - Clause House (approx. 6.3 miles away); Daniel Cresap (approx. 8.3 miles away in Maryland). Click for a list of all markers in Keyser.
 
More about this marker. An exact duplicate of this marker can be found on S. Mineral Street at Carskadon Lane.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia Entry for Keyser, West Virginia. “Because of the importance of the railroad, the town changed hands 14 times. At the time, West Virginia became a state in 1863 there was some contention between Piedmont and New Creek over the location of the county seat. As an inducement to have the county seat located
View East at Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 5, 2010
3. View East at Marker
in New Creek, the Davis brothers donated land for the courthouse in 1867 and is still in use. In 1874, the town was incorporated as ‘Keyser’ to honor William Keyser, Vice President of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Supposedly, intended to gain favor with Mr. Keyser and the railroad to ensure that they would move all rail operations from Piedmont to Keyser.” (Submitted on July 9, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 

2. Wikipedia entry for General W. W. Averell. “Averell left the Army of the Potomac after his relief at Chancellorsville and fought a series of minor engagements in the Department of West Virginia at the brigade and division level. In November 1863, he conducted what is called Averell’s West Virginia Raid against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. He received a brevet promotion to lieutenant colonel in the regular army for the Battle of Droop Mountain in West Virginia on November 6, 1863, and to colonel for actions at Salem, Virginia, on December 15, 1863. In the spring of 1864, he led another cavalry raid toward Saltville but was stopped by Generals John Hunt Morgan and
View West at Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 5, 2010
4. View West at Marker
The traffic light in the distance is the intersection of US 220 and WV 46.
William E. ‘Grumble’ Jones at Cove Gap. Returning to West Virginia, he later commanded a cavalry division under Maj. Gen. David Hunter in his failed raid on Lynchburg.” (Submitted on July 9, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 681 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement