Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Riley in Geary County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

First Capitol of Kansas

 
 
First Capitol of Kansas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 30, 2010
1. First Capitol of Kansas Marker
Inscription. This building was erected in 1855 in the now extinct town of Pawnee for the first legislature of the territory of Kansas. The members were mostly Missourians, fraudulently elected in an effort to make Kansas a slave state. They came in wagons and on horseback, well armed, and camped out on the prairie. The session lasted from July 2 to 6. The Missourians were determined to legislate nearer home and passed a bill to move to Shawnee Methodist Mission near Kansas City. Governor Reeder vetoed the bill, it was passed over his veto, and this ended the session here. All other acts, including the so-called Bogus Laws, were passed at Shawnee Mission. This building stood in partial ruin until its restoration in 1928 by the Union Pacific railroad.
 
Erected by Kansas Historical Society and State Highway Commission. (Marker Number 24.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kansas Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 39° 5.121′ N, 96° 45.759′ W. Marker is in Fort Riley, Kansas, in Geary County. Marker is on Huebner Road east of 10th Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Riley KS 66442, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
First Capitol of Kansas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, June 30, 2010
2. First Capitol of Kansas Marker
Looking East along Huebner Road.
2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named First Capitol of Kansas (within shouting distance of this marker); Locomotive "6072" (approx. mile away); Fort Riley (approx. 1.2 miles away); Tuttle Park (approx. 1.6 miles away); Sturgis Stadium (approx. 1.6 miles away); To the Memory of the Gallant Dead 26th Cavalry (approx. 1.8 miles away); Global War on Terrorism Monument (approx. 1.8 miles away); In Memory of Civil War Horses and Mules (approx. 1.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Riley.
 
Categories. GovernmentNotable BuildingsPolitics
 
First Capitol of Kansas and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., May 17, 2012
3. First Capitol of Kansas and Marker
First Capitol of Kansas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh
4. First Capitol of Kansas Marker
First Capitol of Kansas Building image. Click for full size.
By Douglas McCleery, Photographer
5. First Capitol of Kansas Building
Library of Congress - HABS KANS,81-FORIL,1-3
Exterior View - North Facade
First Capitol of Kansas Building image. Click for more information.
By David von Riesen, Photographer, circa July 1965
6. First Capitol of Kansas Building
Library of Congress - HABS KANS,81-FORIL,1-5

Click for more information.
First Capitol of Kansas Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., May 17, 2012
7. First Capitol of Kansas Marker
Near the building
<i>Kansas First Territorial Capitol Building</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard by the Clay Center Engraving Co., circa 1932
8. Kansas First Territorial Capitol Building
First territorial legislature convened here July 2, 1855
Adjourned to Shawnee Mission July 6, 1855
Restored by Union Pacific Railroad Company July 2, 1928
Buildings and grounds maintained by the
Kansas State Historical Society
Revocable license for ground outside of Union Pacific
right of way granted by the War Department
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 590 times since then and 2 times this year. Last updated on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   5, 6. submitted on .   7. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   8. submitted on . • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement