Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Liberty Town

 
 
Liberty Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 14, 2010
1. Liberty Town Marker
Inscription. Seth Barton, 1755-1813, fought in the American Revolution, grew wealthy as a shipping merchant, and speculated in real estate. He laid out the subdivision that came to be called Liberty Town in 1812. He is buried at St. George’s Church.

Henry Deane was born a slave in Powhatan County, but arrived in Fredericksburg in 1868 as a free man. He worked for several local businesses but also managed his own livery and speculated in real estate.

This small community, laid out on the edge of town in 1812, greeted overland travelers with a wagon yard, a livery, a blacksmith, and a tavern/hotel. The tavern was called Rising Sun (later the Western Hotel) and stood on Liberty Street, to your front. It burned down in 1836.

Fredericksburg annexed Liberty Town, in 1851, and established a burial ground. Initially called Potters Field, it was later referred to as the Colored Cemetery. In 1861, the town allowed the burial there of 51 Confederate soldiers who had succumbed to disease in nearby encampments.

After the Civil War, the town curtailed burials and this area developed as an African-American neighborhood. Many of the graves were removed to the Shiloh Cemetery (opened in 1882), while new houses and commercial enterprises filled the streetscapes. The Fredericksburg High School, to your left,
Map of Liberty Town from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 14, 2010
2. Map of Liberty Town from the Marker
Liberty Town is outlined in red on this 1890 map of Fredericksburg. The roads at odd angles to the street grid followed the terrain rather than the established street pattern.
has occupied a prominent site since 1919 and students still use its related athletic field.
 
Erected by the Fredericksburg’s Economic Development Authority.
 
Location. 38° 18.046′ N, 77° 27.829′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of George Street and Liberty Street, on the left when traveling west on George Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fredericksburg Roll of Honor (within shouting distance of this marker); A Memorial Landscape (within shouting distance of this marker); The Barton Street Potter's Field (within shouting distance of this marker); Barton Street Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); From a Burying Ground to a Park (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Corporation Burying Ground (about 500 feet away); Fredericksburg Campaign (about 700 feet away); Marye’s Heights (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Regarding Liberty Town. Photograph captions:
Top left photo: African Americans buried in Potters Field were reinterred in the Shiloh Cemetery, at Littlepage
Liberty Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 14, 2010
3. Liberty Town Marker
Liberty Street is to the left of the marker. The building mentioned in a photo caption on the marker can be seen in the distant background (it is the white building).
Street and Monument Avenue.

Top left photo: Small dwellings characterized this post Civil War African-American community. The frame dwelling in this photo was located on Liberty Street, to your front. The brick building in the background is still there.

Center photo: Henry Deane built many of the small houses in Liberty Town, some of which are still visible.
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Entrance to Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery, mentioned on the marker. image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., August 20, 2010
4. Entrance to Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery, mentioned on the marker.
Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery, mentioned on the marker. image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., August 20, 2010
5. Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery, mentioned on the marker.
Burial Grounds of Shiloh Baptist (Old Site & New Site) and Mount Zion Churches.
Modern view of houses on marker. image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., August 20, 2010
6. Modern view of houses on marker.
The two small houses in this picture are featured on the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 942 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement