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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Burlington

 
 
Burlington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
1. Burlington Marker
front
Inscription.
[ front ]
Burlington
The original inhabitants of the part of Farmington known as West Woods were Tunxis Indians. Early settlement by white man was scattered. The first house of record, noted in an estate inventory of 1725, was that of John Wiard, who had bought land in 1721. The settlers petitioned for an ecclesiastical society in 1774, citing their distance from Farmington. It was granted and the Society of West Britain was established. Their first church was built in 1783. A number of Seventh Day Baptists from Rhode Island had settled here and John Davis was appointed elder in 1771 to minister to the group as part of the Hopkinton, Rhode Island, church. By 1780 Elder Davis was appointed to organize an independent church, and it was built in 1800. The parishes of West Britain and New Cambridge were set off in 1785 as the Town of Bristol, and so remained until 1808, when West Britain was incorporated as the Town of Burlington.
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Two prominent educators native to Burlington were Romeo Elton, minister and later classics professor at Brown University, and Herman Humphrey, born in Simsbury, who came here at the age of six, was educated locally, and in 1823 was named president of Amherst College. Among early manufacturers was Ethan Stillman, a firearms maker who contracted in 1808
Burlington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
2. Burlington Marker
back
with the Federal Government for 2500 muskets. Elisha Hotchkiss, a major clockmaker 1820-1837, made clocks for the trade and the Yankee pedlars. George J. Hinman (died 1890) came here in his later years and erected a sawmill, running the first circular saw in the State. The fifth generation of the family is in the same business today. The Bristol copper mine, located mostly in Burlington, was discovered in the late 1700's but not worked until 1802, and spasmodically after until abandoned (1895). The Town is now mainly residential and is a source of water supply to nearby cities.
Erected by the Town of Burlington
The Burlington Historical Society
and the Connecticut Historical Commission
1980
 
Erected 1980 by the Town of Burlington, The Burlington Historical Society, the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 46.132′ N, 72° 57.952′ W. Marker is in Burlington, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of George Washington Turnpike and ielman Highway (Connecticut Route 4), on the right when traveling east on George Washington Turnpike. Click for map. Located next to the Elton Tavern, home of the Burlington Historical Society. Marker is in this post office area: Burlington CT 06013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Burlington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
3. Burlington Marker
markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Burlington Civil War – WW I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Burlington WW II – Korean War – Vietnam War Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); An Industrial History of Unionville, 1780-1880 (approx. 3.3 miles away); Collinsville’s Powerhouse Station No. 3 (approx. 3.5 miles away); The Collins Company Plow Building (approx. 3.6 miles away); Charter Oak Offspring (approx. 3.7 miles away); Collinsville- Railroad from both sides (approx. 3.7 miles away); Canton Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Burlington.
 
Regarding Burlington. In 1806 the Connecticut General Assembly set off and incorporated the Parish of West Britain as the town of Burlington. Although America had been independent from Great Britain for three decades, tradition holds that the new name for West Britain was chosen by the General Assembly to honor England's third Earl of Burlington.
 
Also see . . .
1. Town of Burlington Web Site. (Submitted on July 17, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Burlington, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on July 17, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
3. Burlington Historical Society. (Submitted on July 17, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
The Elton Tavern – 1810 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
4. The Elton Tavern – 1810
Home of the Burlington Historical Society the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places

 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Elton Tavern - Burlington Historical Society image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
5. Elton Tavern - Burlington Historical Society
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 810 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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