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Near Middletown in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Heater House
 
Heater House Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
1. Heater House Marker
 
Inscription. Probably built around 1800, this clapboard-covered log house was once the center of a prosperous 600 acre farm owned by Solomon and Caroline Wunder Heater. Although two of her sons died in Confederate service, Mrs. Heater, a native of Pennsylvania, was a Unionist and frequently provided shelter and supplies to the federals. Her loyalty was ultimately repaid by a 1901 federal grant for some wartime damages.

Donated to the People of the United States
by
Candice and John Richards
of Pennsylvania

 
Erected by Blue and Gray Education Society and Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation.
 
Location. 39° 1.13′ N, 78° 17.634′ W. Marker is near Middletown, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is on Valley Pike (U.S. 11), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located at a pull-off overlooking the Heater House. Marker is in this post office area: Middletown VA 22645, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Cedar Creek (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Creek (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battlefield Center (approx. 0.2 miles away); Heater Fields (approx. 0.3 miles away); Tomb Of An Unknown Soldier (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ramseur Monument (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Creek (approx. half a mile away); The Cauldron (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Middletown.
 
The Battle Map Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
2. The Battle Map
 

 
More about this marker. On the left the marker displays "The Heater House, Middleton, Virginia." And on the right is a map of "The Battle of Cedar Creek: Troop movements from 5 A.M. to 10 A.M."
 
Regarding Heater House. The Cedar Creek battlefield is interpreted by several markers. See the Battle of Cedar Creek Virtual Tour by Markers link below.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Heater House. From the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation. See the links at the bottom for the Foundation, which includes a link to information about the Heater House. (Submitted on November 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Cedar Creek Battlefield. The National Parks Service lists the Heater House as one of the standing landmarks of the battlefield. (Submitted on November 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Cedar Creek Virtual Tour by Markers. The related markers here follow a tour of the Cedar Creek Battlefield, October 19, 1864. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Battle of Cedar Creek Preservation Efforts. Civil War Preservation Trust site detailing preservation efforts at the battlefield. The site includes a wealth of background information on the battle and an animated map. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Circle Tour and Heater House Markers at the Pulloff Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
3. Circle Tour and Heater House Markers at the Pulloff
 

 
Additional comments.
1. The Heater's Confederate sons
The two sons mentioned in the marker were John Philip Heater and Henry W. Heater.

John was a resident of Middletown at the opening of the war, but enlisted in Co. E, 7th Virginia Cavalry at Front Royal. He was listed as 5th sergeant by November 1861. Wounded at Patterson's Creek, Virginia (West Virginia), he died of his wounds on 1/5/64 and was buried in the Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester.

Henry W. Heater was a resident of Front Royal at the opening of the war and also enlisted in Co. E, 7th Virginia Cavalry, though he enliste at Romney. He is listed as a 3rd coporal in November 1862, and a 2nd corporal by February 1864. Wounded at Funkstown, Md. on 7/7/63, he was detached on hospital duty in Staunton for several months in 1864. However, he was captured at Point of Rocks, Va. (Loudoun County) on 8/13/64, was paroled at Staunton, and was later "caught with arms and prowling about the country as a guerilla;" quite a difference between his sentiments and those of his mother. He was confined in Old Capitol Prison, 8/13/64. Following transfer to Ft. Delaware later that month, he died on March 18, 1865 of small pox and was buried at Finn's Point Cemetery, New Jersey (though there is a headstone for him at the Stonewall Cemetery in Winchester.
 
The Heater House Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
4. The Heater House
 
    — Submitted March 27, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.

 
Credits. This page originally submitted on November 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,676 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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