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Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Early Life in the Backcountry

Gouedy's Trading Post and Fort Ninety Six

 
 
Early Life in the Backcountry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
1. Early Life in the Backcountry Marker
Inscription.
Robert Gouedy established a trading post on this site in 1753. He supplied cloth, tools, gunpowder, lead, and rum to the soldiers, Indians, slaves, and settlers who passed through Ninety Six on the way to or from Charleston and the Cherokee villages. Representatives of the British colonial government often came through here, as well.

As the backcountry population grew, so did violence between settlers and Indians. Indian attacks were often precipitated by the French, trying to wrest South Carolina from British control. In October 1759, British Governor Lyttleton formed a militia to protect settlers against Indian attacks. He searched for "a proper Place to build a Magazine and Stockade Fort." At the crossroads of Ninety Six, he found Gouedy's post. Lyttleton commandeered Gouedy's house, barn, and outbuildings, enclosed them in a 90-foot-square stockade, and garrisoned his militia. Renamed Fort Ninety Six, this was the site of at least two dramatic Indian attacks in 1760.

By the end of 1761 the British and Cherokee negotiated a truce. As the town of Ninety Six developed near the Island Ford Road, Fort Ninety Six was abandoned and all traces of it disappeared. Gouedy prospered, eventually owning over 1,500 acres of land in Ninety Six and 34 slaves until his death in 1775.

An account of the March 3,
Early Life in the Backcountry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
2. Early Life in the Backcountry Marker
1760 attack appeared in the South Carolina Gazette:

...about 240 or 250 Indians attacked the Fort...and fired upon it for 36 Hours, without scarce any Intermission, even during the whole Night, but never came within 60 yards of the Stockade, except one fellow, who was killed and scalped, and whose body was given to the Dogs, and his Scalp hoisted along-side of the Colours, to provoke the Enemy to come nearer.
 
Erected 2009 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 34° 8.373′ N, 82° 1.083′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker can be reached from South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gouedy Trail and Charleston Road (approx. 0.3 miles away); Why Did the British Burn Ninety Six? (approx. 0.4 miles away); Law and Order in the Carolina Backcountry (approx. 0.4 miles away); The American Revolution Comes to the South (approx. 0.4 miles away); Woman and Child (approx. 0.4 miles away); Spring Branch (approx. 0.4
Early Life in the Backcountry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
3. Early Life in the Backcountry Marker
miles away); Ninety Six (approx. 0.4 miles away); Covered Way (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Star Fort (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Well (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
Also see . . .
1. Gouedy Interpretive Trail. From the Ninety Six Historic Trail, near the Star Fort earthworks, you can pick up a trail guide and begin this short, foot traffic only, spur trail that loops through the area where Robert Goudey's trading post once thrived. (Submitted on July 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. The Gowdy Family in South Carolina - Robert Gouedy. No one is certain how the village Ninety Six got its name. (Submitted on July 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. French and Indian War. The French and Indian War is the common U.S. name for the war between Great Britain and France in North America from 1754 to 1763 (Submitted on July 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. William Lyttelton, 1st Baron Lyttelton. William Henry Lyttelton, 1st Baron Lyttelton (24 December 1724 – 14 September 1808) was the youngest son of
Early Life in the Backcountry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
4. Early Life in the Backcountry Marker
Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 4th Baronet. (Submitted on July 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationForts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, French and Indian
 
Artist's Rendering of Trading at Gouedy's Post image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
5. Artist's Rendering of Trading at Gouedy's Post
Early Life in the Backcountry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
6. Early Life in the Backcountry Marker
Site of Gouedy's Post and Fort Ninety Six image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
7. Site of Gouedy's Post and Fort Ninety Six
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 842 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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