Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bristol in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The History of Memorial Boulevard

 
 
The History of Memorial Boulevard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
1. The History of Memorial Boulevard Marker
Inscription.
The History of
Memorial Boulevard
In 1919, after the "Great War", Bristol was growing and needed a new high school. Albert F. Rockwell took the initiative and made a remarkable offer to the city. He would give 12 acres in Dunbar Meadows (north of South street) for the school if the city would construct a road 100 feet wide, build a bridge over the river at Mellen Street and finish the high school within two years. Due to the difficulty of the removal of two unused water plants and the need to re-channel the river, construction was delayed. Rockwell, himself, consented to become construction supervisor at no cost to the city and the school was started in 1921.
The road of course is Memorial Boulevard and was officially opened on November 11, 1921, commemorating Armistice Day and the dedication of a new fire house in a "triple celebration". From its entrance at Downes Street to its terminus at Main Street, the road measured 4,400 feet in length and was 100 feet wide with a central plot. The grass and trees were planted after the opening and the mountain laurels were planted in 1931.
The new high school, designed by Wilson Potter, was opened in September of 1922 but was not officially dedicated until the following year.
The World War I monument was designed by Lt. Harold A. Hayden. It consists of a circular
The History of Memorial Boulevard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
2. The History of Memorial Boulevard Marker
base with steps that lead to a five-point star. On the sides of the star are bronze plaques listing all who entered the service from Bristol. Above these names is the inscription "The City of Bristol to honor its residents who served in the world war, here records their names." Above this carved in stone, are the names of those who died with the solemn inscription, " These Gave Their Lives." From the roadway to the tip, the monument is 371/2 feet tall. It was dedicated on Selchepray Day, April 19, 1924. Selchepray Day commemorates the Battle of Selchepray in which eight Bristol men were killed in action, several others wounded and 27 were made prisoners and remained in German prison camps until the Armistice.
Linda Jasinski, Bristol
The writer is vice president of the Bristol Historical Society. Reprinted with permission.
1) "To remember and to honor those from Bristol who served God and their Country in World War II and Korea." 2) The Hiker – Spanish American War Soldier – Given by the Vanesse Family in memory of World War II Veterans – Nov. 12, 1984 3) In Memory of the Revolutionary War Patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortune for their country - placed by Katherine Gaylord Chapter - Daughters of the American Revolution - 1984 4) A captured German artillery piece – Dedicated to the memory of our fallen comrades and presented
The History of Memorial Boulevard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
3. The History of Memorial Boulevard Marker
to the City of Bristol by Harold F, Emmett, Post 991 VFW – July 17, 1926 5) World War I Monument 6) Veterans Memorial Park – In Memory of Veterans of all wars. Dedicated Memorial Day 1973 – Bristol Veterans Council 7) "Beneath this rock lies the 1985 Bicentennial Time Capsule." – Donated by the Funk Funeral Home. To be opened June 3, 2035, a project of the Older Members' Association of the Bristol Boys Club. 8) This plaque is in recognition of all the men and women from Bristol and Forestville who served their Country with pride during the Persian Gulf War, Operation Desert Storm - August 7, 1994. 9) In Honor of Bristol citizen soldiers who through services with Militia Units and National Guard, have defended and preserved our community, State and Nation in our wars and emergencies since Colonial times. 10) Vietnam Conflict – In memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice. 11) "On this site stood the Vietnam Veterans Moving Wall" – August 11th – 18th 1998. 12) Korean War 1950 – 1953 – Served with Honor – To those who died, Honor and Eternal Rest - To those still missing, Remembrance And Hope - To those who returned, Gratitude And Peace. 13) This memorial was erected to honor those soldiers from Bristol, Connecticut who lost their lives during World War I. A pin – oak tree has been planted along the Memorial
Memorial Boulevard Looking East image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
4. Memorial Boulevard Looking East
The marker is at the left, near the gazebo. The pin oak trees planted in 1922 can be seen lining each side of Memorial Boulevard.
Boulevard, which was donated to the City of Bristol by Albert F. Rockwell, in memoriam for each soldier who made the supreme sacrifice. This commemorative tree was planted on November 11, Veterans Day, 1968. 14) Photo of the original Vietnam Moving Wall that visited Bristol August 12 – 18, 1998.
 
Location. 41° 40.178′ N, 72° 55.887′ W. Marker is in Bristol, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is on Memorial Boulevard 0.2 miles east of East Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located in Memorial Boulevard Park. Marker is in this post office area: Bristol CT 06010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bristol Revolutionary War Plaque (a few steps from this marker); Bristol Persian Gulf War Monument (a few steps from this marker); Bristol World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); 1985 Bicentennial Time Capsule (within shouting distance of this marker); Bristol Korean War Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Hiker (within shouting distance of this marker); Bristol Vietnam Conflict Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Bristol Veterans Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Bristol.
 
Also see . . .  Bristol Veterans' Memorial Boulevard. (Submitted on July 26, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
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Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 860 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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