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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Plantsville in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route

 
 
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
1. Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker
Inscription. Southington
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and vaval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau's troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington's Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Earl Cornwallis and the British army in Yorktown, Virginia. After a prolonged seige, Cornwallis surrendered on October 19, 1781, virtually ending the war and ensuring American independence.
This is one of 12 informative panels that mark the French route south through Connecticut from June 19 to July 2, 1781 and on the return north October 23 to November 9, 1782.

Southington became a town in 1779 – during the American Revolution. Its first town meetings dealt with supporting the American cause: providing bonuses for residents who enlisted in the Continental Army and arranging for the support of dependents of enlistees.
There were 138 men who served in the military forces during the Revolution out of a town-wide population of only about 1,500. Some Southington residents served as minutemen, committed to arming themselves on short notice
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
2. Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker
to defend against British attacks. They were called to defend both Danbury and New Haven.
After several years of sacrifice and discouraging news, local residents were inspired and encouraged by some 4,700 French troops with artillery and wagon trains marching through town on the way to join General George Washington in what is today White Plains, New York.
 
Erected 2006 by Southington Rotary Club, Connecticut Commission On Culture & Tourism.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Washington-Rochambeau Route marker series.
 
Location. 41° 35.268′ N, 72° 53.344′ W. Marker is in Plantsville, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Connecticut Route 10) and Grove Street, on the left when traveling north on Main Street. Click for map. Located next to the gazebo on the Plantsville Green. Marker is in this post office area: Plantsville CT 06479, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gang Scarpa Shoda (approx. one mile away); Southington World War II (approx. 1.1 miles away); Southington Soldiers Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); Southington
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
3. Detail from the Marker
Rochambeau Monument
In 1912, the American Irish Historical Society erected a monument at "French Hill" in Marion to mark the area where comte de Rochambeau's army had camped in 1781 and again in 1782 after the combined American and French victory at Yorktown.
Photograph provided by Andrea Triano-LaChapelle

(See the related marker for details of the monument. It is now surrounded by houses)
(approx. 1.1 miles away); Southington Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); Constitution Oak (approx. 1.1 miles away); Forever Honored Forever Mourned (approx. 1.2 miles away); Reverend Zygmunt Woroniecki (approx. 1.2 miles away).
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
4. Detail from the Marker
Asa Barnes Tavern
"Landlord Barnes gave a ball at this tavern, at which a large number of the young women of the vicinity were present; and they esteemed it something of an honor to have had a 'cotillion' with polite foreigner."
Herman Timlow; Ecclesiastical and other Sketches of Southington, Conn., 1875. Illustration by Robert LaRese provided by the LaRese family.

Cotillion: Originating from the French "cote" for coat or petticoat. In 1875, the term may have referred to what was by then a common ocurrence of a formal ball at which young women are presented to society. The term originated in France in the 1700s to mean a lively dance, having varied, intricate patterns and steps. Timlow probably used the term because the ball at Asa Barnes Tavern may have been the first social outing for many of the " young women of the vicinity."
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
5. Detail from the Marker
Seventh Day's March: Farmington to Barnes Tavern, 1781
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
6. Detail from the Marker
French Army maps of Southington
1781 French Army maps by cartographer Louis Alexandre Berthier. Annotated with 2006 landmarks by Stephen Giudice of Harry E. Cole & Son and Lawrence T. Alberti.
Courtesy of the Berthier Map Collection at Princeton University.
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
7. Detail from the Marker
Four Day Procession
On June 26, 27, 28 and 29, 1781, Rochambeau's army marched south through Southington from the preceding campsite in Farmington. The army proceeded down what later became known as Queen Street and Main Street. At "The Corner" – later known as Plantsville, where the roads to Farmington, Waterbury and new Haven converged – the army turned west toward the next campsite in an area of Southington later known as Marion. One of the French officers, comte de Clermont-Crèvecoeur, in his journal, noted that "The roads were quite good, and the day not very tiring." The following day's march, over the steep roads from Marion to Middlebury, was different. He reported, "Numerous mountains and rocky roads delayed the arrival of the artillery until after three in the morning. Our horses could do no more, so we had to commandeer all the oxen we passed and go far afield to find others in order to reach camp with our guns. Many of our wagons broke down. We never had a worse day, considering the fatigues and misfortunes we encountered."
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 1,035 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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