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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Farmington in Fayette County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Road to Disaster

 
 
Upper Half of Road to Disaster Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
1. Upper Half of Road to Disaster Marker
Inscription. On June 25, 1755, the largest army assembled in North America up to that time passed this spot. British Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock led the first 1,400 soldiers of his 2,400-man army along a 12-foot-wide road. Lt. Col. Thomas Dunbar lagged behind with 1,000 men and the army's supplies. Braddock's goal of expelling the French from Fort Duquesne (present-day Pittsburgh) was thwarted when his advance troops collided with a force of French and Indians.

On July 14, what remained of that once proud British army hobbled past this point, retreating from their disastrous defeat at the Battle of the Monongahela. Today, the trail leads to this remnant of the "Braddock Road" where a British army marched toward battle, returned in defeat, and buried its fallen leader.
 
Erected by Fort Necessity National Battlefield, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Braddock’s Road and Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock marker series.
 
Location. 39° 49.95′ N, 79° 36.027′ W. Marker is near Farmington, Pennsylvania, in Fayette County. Marker can be reached from National Pike (U.S. 40) 1.2 miles east of Fayette Springs Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Farmington PA 15437, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers
Lower Half of Road to Disaster Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
2. Lower Half of Road to Disaster Marker
Caption: British Maj. General Edward Braddock receives a mortal wound during the Battle of the Monongahela on July 9, 1755, as painted by Edwin Deming.
are within walking distance of this marker. A Secret Grave (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Braddock Road (within shouting distance of this marker); First Roads to the West (within shouting distance of this marker); Braddock’s Grave (within shouting distance of this marker); Braddock Park (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Farmington.
 
Additional comments.
1. Time Line from the Marker
April 1754 — Lt. Col. George Washington marches northwest from Alexandria, Virginia to the frontier with 132 Virginia militia under orders from Virginia Lt. Gov. Robert Dinwiddie. Washington's mission is to occupy and defend the Upper Ohio Valley against a French force advancing south from Canada.

May 28, 1754 — Ensign Joseph Coulon de Jumonville and 31 French troops skirmish with 40 Virginia militia under Washington and about 12 Indians. Ten French are killed, including Jumonville, and 21 are captured, including one wounded. One man escapes and reports the attack, to become known as the "Jumonville Affair."

July 3, 1754 — About 600 French and 100 Indians under Captain Louis Coulon de Villiers, Jumonville's brother, surround Washington's command of almost 400 British at Fort Necessity. After a day of fighting, the British surrender and are allowed to march away; the French burn Fort Necessity on July 4.

1755 — Maj. General
Close-Up of Map on Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
3. Close-Up of Map on Marker
Edward Braddock leads about 2,400 British troops, including 400 colonial militia from Alexandria, Virginia to expel the French from Fort Duquesne. His troops improve Washington's road of 1754 and extend it to the Monongahela River near present-day Pittsburgh.

July 9, 1755 — Braddock's army is defeated by the French and their Indians allies at the Battle of Monongahela near Fort Duquesne. Braddock is mortally wounded and dies on July 13 during the British retreat. He is buried in the middle of "Braddock's Road" about one mile west of Fort Necessity.
    — Submitted May 7, 2006.

 
Categories. Colonial EraWar, French and Indian
 
Road to Disaster Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
4. Road to Disaster Marker
Braddock's Grave monument can be seen in the distance at the left of this photograph.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,300 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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