“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hampton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

Hampton Baptist Church

Hampton Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 31, 2010
1. Hampton Baptist Church Marker
Inscription. In 1791 Grafton Baptist Church, in York County, founded a mission in Hampton, Hampton Baptist Church, which called its first pastor, Richard Hurst, in 1806. After the War of 1812, the church began to grow so that it had 185 members by 1837. During this period the church purchased the present site and had 500 members by 1844. The church was burned during the Civil War and rebuilding began with a small structure in 1869 by the 139 remaining members. The present brick sanctuary was constructed in 1883. Additions to the building were made in 1919, 1941, 1952, and 1961. The membership in 1990 was 1115, when this plaque was erected.
Erected 1990.
Location. 37° 1.601′ N, 76° 20.663′ W. Marker is in Hampton, Virginia. Marker is on Kings Way 0.1 miles south of Lincoln Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 40 Kings Way, Hampton VA 23669, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hampton Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); The Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); The Northeast Corner (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Sclater Building
Hampton Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 31, 2010
2. Hampton Baptist Church
(about 300 feet away); McDowell's Inn (about 500 feet away); Historic Hampton (about 600 feet away); The Magnolia Tree Inn (about 600 feet away); Hampton Is Burned (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Hampton.
Regarding Hampton Baptist Church. Excerpt from the Hampton Baptist Church website.
...In summer 1861, Confederate troops burned the City of Hampton rather than allowing it to fall into the hands of Union forces. Included in the destruction was the loss of Hampton Baptist Church's meeting place and its records. A witness reported:

The church was burning like a furnace and the flames were belching out of its steeple like an inferno… it seemed as if hell itself had broken lose and all its fiery demons were pouring oil on the flames.

In the aftermath of this disaster, Pastor George Adams became a chaplain in the Confederate Army, but continued to shepherd the remnant of his flock until 1862, when Union forces arrested him as a spy. With their pastor imprisoned on the Rip Raps in Hampton Roads, and the congregation scattered by the forces of conflict, the church reached a new low point in its life. ...
Also see . . .  Historical Highlights of Hampton Baptist Church. (Submitted on August 2, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraWar, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 533 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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