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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Valley Furnace in Barbour County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Valley Furnace

 
 
Valley Furnace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2010
1. Valley Furnace Marker
Inscription. Iron ore was discovered here, 1835, by John Johnson. The Old Iron Furnace, built, 1848, was operated for six years by C.W. Bryant and Isaac Marsh. In 1850, a steam engine replaced the water power used to run fan air blast. Charcoal was fuel used. About 9,000 pounds of iron were produced daily. The iron was hauled by mule team 50 miles to the Monogahela River near Fairmont for shipment by boat to down-river markets.
 
Erected 1965 by West Virginia Historic Commission.
 
Location. 39° 11.77′ N, 79° 52.017′ W. Marker is in Valley Furnace, West Virginia, in Barbour County. Marker is on State Highway 38, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moatsville WV 26405, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Randolph County / Tucker County (approx. 8.5 miles away); Seneca Trail (approx. 8.8 miles away); St. George (approx. 9 miles away); Barbour County Korean War Memorial (approx. 9.7 miles away); Philippi (approx. 9.7 miles away); Barbour County War Memorial
Valley Furnace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2010
2. Valley Furnace Marker
(approx. 9.7 miles away); a different marker also named Philippi (approx. 9.7 miles away); Barbour County Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial (approx. 9.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Antebellum Iron Works in Western Virginia. Photo of the furnace ruins in better days, plus a detailed look at the iron industry in the state. (Submitted on August 2, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Furnace Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2010
3. Furnace Ruins
Water Power for Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2010
4. Water Power for Furnace
Originally water was diverted from a nearby stream to power air blast machines at the furnace.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 722 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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