Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Farmington in Fayette County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The National Road

 
 
The National Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
1. The National Road Marker
Inscription. This "National Road" connected east and west in the 1800s. George Washington proposed a route to join the western frontier to the eastern seaboard in the late 1700s. His idea was later promoted by Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison—and Congress authorized the road in 1806.

Work started in 1811. While a privately funded road connected Baltimore with Cumberland, Maryland, this first federally funded highway tied Cumberland to Wheeling, Virginia, in 1818. By 1839 the road stretched more than 600 miles to Vandalia, Illinois. Although railroads eventually displaced it, the National Road's success set the stage for today's national highway system.
 
Erected by Fort Necessity National Battlefield, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 49.076′ N, 79° 35.251′ W. Marker is near Farmington, Pennsylvania, in Fayette County. Marker can be reached from National Pike (U.S. 40) west of the entrance to Fort Necessity Battlefield, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of the Mount
A Conestoga Wagon, The "Tractor-Trailer" of the 19th Century image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
2. A Conestoga Wagon, The "Tractor-Trailer" of the 19th Century
Washington Tavern. Marker is in this post office area: Grindstone PA 15442, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mount Washington Tavern (here, next to this marker); Fort Necessity (a few steps from this marker); The Great Meadows (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Great Meadows Campaign (approx. mile away); a different marker also named National Road (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Farmington.
 
Also see . . .  The National Road. (Submitted on May 8, 2006.)
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
Marker at the Conestoga Wagon Display image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
3. Marker at the Conestoga Wagon Display
Searight-Shuman Memorial. In Memory of pioneer families of Western Pennsylvania. Hon. William Searight, Rachel Brownfield Searight and descendants, Captain Thomas Bowman Shuman, Jean Ramsey Searight Shuman and descendants, beloved daughter Jean Elizabeth Searight Shuman-Shipley. Erected by Mrs. Rachel Searight Shuman Shipley.
Historic Mile Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, 2002
4. Historic Mile Marker
Located in the Mount Washington Tavern Museum, is this iron road marker originally located on the National Road nearby.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,613 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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