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Thomasville in Davidson County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Thomasville City Cemetery

Union of Combatants

 
 
Thomasville City Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
1. Thomasville City Cemetery Marker
Inscription. (Preface):
John W. Thomas, who represented this area in the state legislature in the mid-1800s, laid out the town of Thomasville in 1852 on the proposed route of the North Carolina Railroad. Three years later, the line was completed to the new town, and the first train passed through on January 20, 1856. By 1860, Thomasville was thriving with 308 residents, a female seminary and a shoe factory. After the war, the town became noted for its furniture-making industry, especially chair manufacturing.
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Thomasville grew during the Civil War at first because of the importance of its shoe factories and later because of the location here of hospitals and convalescent facilities for soldiers. The Union occupation of North Carolina’s coastal region in 1862 caused the first influx of civilian refugees and wounded soldiers. In March 1865, the last major Confederate army, commanded by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, brought its wounded here as it retreated during the campaign against Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s army. The battles of Averasboro and Bentonville (March 13 and March 19-21, 1865) resulted in many Confederate casualties and wounded Federal prisoners. Wayside hospitals were established in a tobacco warehouse and in the local Baptist and Methodist churches by Dr. Simon Baruch of South Carolina, later
Thomasville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
2. Thomasville Marker
an authority on hygiene and water therapy and the father of renowned early-20th-century financier and presidential advisor Bernard Baruch. The dead from these hospitals, Northern and Southern, were buried in this cemetery together, a practice almost unknown during the war. More information concerning the city’s role in the war and the soldiers interred here is available at the Thomasville Depot, located one-half mile west at the intersection of East Main and Trade Streets.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 53.221′ N, 80° 4.838′ W. Marker is in Thomasville, North Carolina, in Davidson County. Marker can be reached from Memorial Park Drive, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is located in Thomasville City Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Thomasville NC 27360, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Thomasville (approx. 0.2 miles away); John W. Thomas (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Thomasville (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named John W. Thomas
Marker in the Thomasville City Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
3. Marker in the Thomasville City Cemetery
The common plot for both Northern and Southern soldiers is seen to the left in this photo.
(approx. 3.1 miles away); John H. Mills (approx. 3.5 miles away); NC Vietnam Veterans Memorial (approx. 4.2 miles away); Trinity College (approx. 5 miles away); a different marker also named Trinity College (approx. 5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Thomasville.
 
More about this marker. Three photos, Courtesy Library of Congress, appear at the lower part of the marker. The first is of a battlefield scene and has a caption of “Wounded soldiers often received their initial treatment on the battlefield. Union Surgeon Anson Hurd, 14th Indiana Volunteers, tends wounded Confederates in a field hospital after the Battle of Antietam, Sept. 1862.” The next one depicts “Wounded Union soldiers at the U.S. Sanitary Commission depot, Fredericksburg, Va., May 20, 1864.” The last photo is of the interior of a hospital and has the caption “Temporary hospitals were established in dwellings, churches, barns, warehouses and schools. This is a ward in a permanent facility, Harewood General Hospital, Washington, D.C., photographed during the war, showing mosquito netting for the patients’ beds.”
Thomasville City Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
4. Thomasville City Cemetery Marker

 
Also see . . .  Western North Carolina Civil War Sites. North Carolina Civil War Trails (Submitted on August 11, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Thomasville City Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
5. Thomasville City Cemetery
The marker is located inside of Thomasville's City Cemetery seen here.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 864 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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