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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Browns Mills in Burlington County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Elizabeth Coleman White

Women's Heritage Trail

 
 
Elizabeth Coleman White Marker image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
1. Elizabeth Coleman White Marker
Inscription. Elizabeth Coleman White was born in 1871, the eldest of four daughters, and is best known as a pioneer in the blueberry industry. She never married and spent most of her life in the New Jersey Pinelands at Whitesbog Village - her family's cranberry farm. She began searching for a companion crop to the cranberry. In 1911 she read "Experiments in Blueberry Culture" by Dr. Frederick V. Coville, a botanist with the USDA, and they began a long partnership. Five years later, in 1916, White produced the first commercial crop of blueberries!
Elizabeth White's interests did not end with the cultivation of the blueberry; she helped organize the New Jersey Blueberry Cooperative Association, was the first woman member of the American Cranberry Association, and became the first woman to receive a New Jersey Department of Agriculture citation for her outstanding contributions to New Jersey agriculture. White also formed her own corporation based upon the cultivation of ornamental plants such as the holly and Franklinia. She supported research concerning the teaching of disabled persons and became involved in founding a work-training school for the local population. In 1914, a report of the NJ Child Labor Committee singled White out for her concern for the health of the farm workers, whom she provided with nursing care. The report documented
Elizabeth Coleman White Marker in front of Suningive image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
2. Elizabeth Coleman White Marker in front of Suningive
that workers at Whitesbog received better accommodations than other New Jersey farming bogs.
In 1923, White built her home, naming it Suningive. She surrounded the house with native Pineland plants. In her later years, her garden of native plants became world-renowned. Today, White would be considered a consummate conservation gardener. Elizabeth Coleman White passed away in 1954, but her unsurpassed legacy lives on.
"A rare privilege has been mine to bring birth and assist in guiding the first steps of a horticultural industry..."
--Taming Blueberries (Program of the Garden Club of NJ; Presented via WOR, Trenton, 1937)
Historic Whitesbog Village is on the New Jersey Women's Heritage Trail because of the innovative contributions of Horticulturist Elizabeth Coleman White.
The New Jersey Woman's Heritage Trail highlights a collection of historic sites located around the state that represent the significant contributions women made to the history of our state. The Heritage Trail brings to life the vital role of women in New Jersey's past and present.
 
Erected 2008 by NJ Historic Trust/Historic Preservation Office.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the New Jersey Women’s Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 39° 57.621′ 
Northwest corner of Suningive image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
3. Northwest corner of Suningive
N, 74° 30.409′ W. Marker is in Browns Mills, New Jersey, in Burlington County. Marker is on West Whitesbog Road 0.2 miles east of North Whitesbog Road, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located in Historic Whitesbog Village in Brendan T. Byrne State Forest. Marker is in this post office area: Browns Mills NJ 08015, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A Million Dollar Resource (approx. 0.2 miles away); Whitesbog Village (approx. 0.2 miles away); Conservation and Environmental Studies Center, Inc. (approx. 0.2 miles away); Exploring the Pinelands (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dedicated To Those Who Served (approx. 4 miles away); A Limited Resource (approx. 5.6 miles away); MacDonald Hall (approx. 7.1 miles away); 44th Infantry Division (approx. 7.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Browns Mills.
 
Also see . . .
1. Elizabeth Coleman White. (Submitted on August 10, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.)
2. Whitebog Preservation Trust. (Submitted on August 10, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.)
3. Library of Congress-Historic American Landscapes Survey/Historic American Engineering Record. (Submitted on August 10, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. AgricultureEnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryIndustry & Commerce
 
Northeast corner of Suningive image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
4. Northeast corner of Suningive
Sign is located at the front door image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
5. Sign is located at the front door
Commemorative stone located behind Suningive image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
6. Commemorative stone located behind Suningive
"The cranberry bog would serve as lawn. It had been started by my grandfather, had furnished the means for Suningive and inspiration for its garden. For one hundred acres from the windows it stretches to the distant, dark, encircling ring of pines." Elizabeth C. White 1941
Commemorative stone with cranberry bogs in the distance behind image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
7. Commemorative stone with cranberry bogs in the distance behind
Restored potting shed located behind Suningive image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, August 8, 2010
8. Restored potting shed located behind Suningive
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,489 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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