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Salisbury in Rowan County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Rowan County Courthouse

Escaped Destruction

 

—Stoneman’s Raids —

 
Rowan County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
1. Rowan County Courthouse Marker
Inscription. The Old Rowan County Courthouse, a visible reminder of Salisbury’s antebellum prosperity, was erected in 1855 and is one of North Carolina’s finest Greek Revival-style public buildings. It served as Rowan’s third courthouse until 1914. Salisbury native John W. Ellis, who was North Carolina’s governor when the war broke out, was the first judge here. He was called the “secessionist governor” for refusing to send state troops in answer to President Abraham Lincoln’s call for volunteers to suppress the “rebellion.” On May 20, 1861, North Carolina became the last state to secede from the Union.

Almost four years later, on April 12, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman, leading a cavalry raid through western North Carolina, rode into Salisbury. His forces burned vast quantities of military stores, including 10,000 weapons, a million rounds of ammunition, 17,000 uniforms, 250,000 blankets and more than 200 tons of food and other supplies. Light from the giant bonfires reportedly was seen 30 miles away. The stores had been sent to Salisbury to prevent them from falling into Gen. William T. Sherman’s hands as he marched north from Georgia. Stoneman also burned and destroyed the Confederate States Military Prison located in Salisbury. Although Stoneman’s raiders burned military supplies and facilities here in town, the
Salisbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
2. Salisbury Marker
courthouse escaped destruction.

. . . I can be no party to this wicked violation of the laws of the country, and to this war upon the liberties of a free people. You can get no troops from North Carolina.” – Telegram to President Lincoln from Governor Ellis, April 15, 1861.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 40.109′ N, 80° 28.131′ W. Marker is in Salisbury, North Carolina, in Rowan County. Marker is at the intersection of N Main Street (U.S. 29) and W Council Street, on the left when traveling north on N Main Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Salisbury NC 28144, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Washington’s Tour of the Southern States (here, next to this marker); St. Luke’s Episcopal Church (here, next to this marker); Washington Southern Tour (a few steps from this marker); Elizabeth Maxwell Steele (a few steps from this marker); Rowan County World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Old English Cemetery
Civil War Trails Marker on N Main Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
3. Civil War Trails Marker on N Main Street
(about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Salisbury Confederate Memorial (about 600 feet away); Stoneman’s Raid (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Salisbury.
 
More about this marker. The bottom left of the marker contains an “1880-90 photo of courthouse; [which] now houses Rowan Museum and Civil War artifacts.” Also on the marker are portraits of Gen. George Stoneman and John W. Ellis, as well as an “1862 recruiting broadside for guards at C.S. Military Prison - Courtesy of Rowan Museum.”
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Traveler – Stoneman’s Raid. North Carolina Civil War Trails. (Submitted on August 11, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Old Rowan County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2010
4. Old Rowan County Courthouse
The marker is located on the left side of the old courthouse.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 796 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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