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Aiken in Aiken County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Aiken County 125th Anniversary

 
 
Aiken County 125th Anniversary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
1. Aiken County 125th Anniversary Marker
In the top left edge it reads, "Aiken County, SC, 125th Anniversary, Founded 1871.
Inscription.
In Commemoration Of The
Founding Of Aiken County

on
March 10, 1871
Celebrating 125 years

County Commissioners:
Sen. C.D. Hayne, Rep. Gloster Holland,
Rep. William B. Jones, Rep. Sam J. Lee,
William Peel, Rep. Prince Rivers,
S. B. Spencer, F.P. Stoney

Erected March 10, 1996

 
Erected 1996 by Aiken County.
 
Location. 33° 33.587′ N, 81° 43.074′ W. Marker is in Aiken, South Carolina, in Aiken County. Marker is at the intersection of York Street SE and Richland Avenue (U.S. 78), on the right when traveling north on York Street SE. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Aiken SC 29801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Aiken County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Defense of Aiken (within shouting distance of this marker); The Detection of the Neutrino, 1956 / The Nobel Prize In Physics, 1995 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Aiken First Baptist Church (about 400 feet away); Battle of Aiken (about 500 feet away); Aiken County
Aiken County 125th Anniversary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Aiken County 125th Anniversary Marker
The bottom plaque lists names, at the time this marker was dedicated, of the County Council, as well as the Chairpersons, Coordinator, and members of the Aiken County QuasQuicentennial Commission.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); James F. Byrnes (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. John's Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Original Survey of Aiken (approx. 0.2 miles away); William Aiken, Sr. (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Aiken.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Aiken County, S.C. Aiken County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. (Submitted on August 10, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. County, once booming, now shadows town it used to rival. Hamburg, S.C. - This once-proud river and railroad town, a rival to Augusta three decades before the Civil War, is now a flooded and almost forgotten Aiken County hamlet, overshadowed by a far brighter skyline to the west and the ragged highway that climbs the incline that bears its founder's name, Schultz Hill. (Submitted on March 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Prince Rivers. Prince Rivers (1824–1887) was a corporal and later sergeant in the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, a Union regiment in the American Civil War. (Submitted on June 4, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Samuel J. Lee (1827-1895)
Pictures of the three Black lawmakers instrumental in founding Aiken County image. Click for full size.
By Augusta Chronicle, circa 2004
3. Pictures of the three Black lawmakers instrumental in founding Aiken County
Prince R. Rivers, Charles D. Hayne, and Samuel J. Lee - from the plaque displayed at the Aiken County Historical Museum.
. Lee was born in Abbeville County, South Carolina. (Submitted on June 4, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Samuel J. Lee Obituary. Samuel J. Lee, colored, who succeeded Franklin J. Moses as Speaker of the House of Representatives of South Carolina in 1872, died suddenly in Charleston Monday of heart disease. (Submitted on June 4, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Aiken County: S.C.'s Reconstruction County
Aiken County bears distinction as the only county formed in South Carolina during the turbulent years of Reconstruction. It was created on March 10, 1871 by a General Assembly controlled by freed blacks and Radical Republicans. Aiken's first postmaster was a freeman named Charles D. Hayne, a Confederate veteran who defended Charleston from Union troops.

The tension between white Democrats and war veterans and freed blacks and Radical Republicans came to a head in July 1876 during the Hamburg Massacre. Two blacks and one white were killed during the battle. As a result, five blacks were executed by white troops.
    — Submitted August 22, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. African AmericansNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Aiken County 125th Anniversary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 2, 2015
4. Aiken County 125th Anniversary Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,983 times since then and 7 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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