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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Haven in New Haven County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Noah Webster House

 
 
Noah Webster House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 18, 2010
1. Noah Webster House Marker
Inscription.
Here stood the house of
Noah Webster
Class of 1778
Author of The American
Spelling Book and of An American
Dictionary of the English Language

 
Location. 41° 18.652′ N, 72° 55.445′ W. Marker is in New Haven, Connecticut, in New Haven County. Marker is at the intersection of Temple Street and Grove Street, on the right when traveling south on Temple Street. Click for map. Located on a wall of a dormitory of Silliman College, Yale University. Marker is in this post office area: New Haven CT 06511, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Robert Newman's Barn (within shouting distance of this marker); Hillhouse Avenue Bridge (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); In Memory of Augustus Canfield Ledyard (about 700 feet away); In Memory of the Men of Yale (about 700 feet away); Hezekiah Augur (about 800 feet away); Pierpont Edwards (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ross Granville Harrison (approx. 0.2 miles away); Grove Street Cemetery Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in New Haven.
 
Also see . . .  Noah Webster on Wikipedia. (Submitted on August 25, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicEducation
 
Noah Webster House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 18, 2010
2. Noah Webster House Marker
The building is a dormitory of Silliman College, Yale University
Noah Webster<br>1758-1843 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. Noah Webster
1758-1843
This 1833 painting by James Herring hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“A new nation required a new language. Or so thought the editor and writer Noah Webster, who devoted his lifetime to the idea of a specifically Amer­ican language, one ‘as independent in literature as in politics,’ Webster began his project to create a unified national culture with his ‘blue-backed spellers" that standardized American spelling. He supplemented the speller with a grammar that relied not on abstract rules but on the observation of actual American usage. The work was an example of the pragmatism and rejection of traditional precedents that characterized American antebellum thinking in fields ranging from law to manufacturing. Webster's great task was the completion of his American Dictionary of the English Language (1828), a reference book whose title announces its intentions to create a lexicographic declaration of independence.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 722 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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