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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

War in the Backyard

 
 
War in the Backyard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
1. War in the Backyard Marker
Inscription. At the beginning of the Civil War, the third generation of the Scots-Irish Glass family lived at Rose Hill. The household consisted of Thomas Glass (age 67), and his wife Margaret (age 51), his son William (age 25) and fifteen slaves, most of them children. The following year Thomas passed away. His son, William, recently married, took over the management of the farm. A Southern supporter, William was commissioned Lt. Col. of the 51st Regiment Virginia Militia serving under Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson during the Bath-Rommey (later West Virginia) campaign in January, 1862. While he was away, his young wife died, and shortly afterwards he was discharged from military service. William would remain at Rose Hill throughout the Civil War.

Young and recently bereaved of both his father and his wife, William Wood Glass was living at the house when the 1st Battle of Kernstown, March 23, 1862, occurred in his backyard. Not surprisingly, his house was used as a shelter for wounded soldiers.

After the Civil War, William and his second wife raised seven children in the Rose Hill farm house. In 1885, they moved to Glen Burnie in Winchester, but William continued to run the farm with the help of tenants. Picnics and outings at their beloved childhood home, Rose Hill, were a favorite Glass family activity, described poignantly
Walking Tour Stop One for Rose Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
2. Walking Tour Stop One for Rose Hill
Note Rose Hill standing in the background behind the fence.
in Susan Glass Strider's 1939 poem.

The way is fair - a ride I pray,
October's glories deck the day

The answer I, O let us go
To the home I used to know!

I would see once more the tree
Where I played in childish glee.

Had for dolls a little school
Where I taught them many a rule.

Faithful still the grand old trees --
Honey locusts in the breeze.

But the brook, how low, how slow!
Once so rollicking its flow.

Where we sailed our tiny boat
Half shell of a cocoanut.

In it sat Miss Golden Hair
Fairest one of all the fair.

Lonely now the fine old home --
Children seven called to roam.

Some so many miles away;
Youngest now is growing grey.


-Rose Hill
by Susan Glass Strider, 1939.
 
Location. 39° 9.102′ N, 78° 13.189′ W. Marker is near Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Jones Road (County Route 621), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located at stop one of the walking tour of Rose Hill. See the link to the Museum of the Shenandoah for details about visiting Rose Hill. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1985 Jones Road, Winchester VA 22602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow
Front of Rose Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
3. Front of Rose Hill
flies. How To See the Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); Rose Hill (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fight for the High Ground (about 600 feet away); Northern Victory, Southern Defeat (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Defense of the Stone Wall (approx. ľ mile away); The Order for Retreat (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Advance of Tylerís Brigade (approx. 0.3 miles away); The First Battle of Kernstown (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left side of the marker is a "Glass family portrait taken at Glen Burnie, 1895. This family returned to their beloved Rose Hill for picnics." Next to the poem on the right is a portrait of "William Wood Glass (1835-1911) by Edward Caledon Bruce, c. 1860." Below it is a photo of "Rose Hill farmhouse as it looked in the 1930s, showing wooden clapboard on the original log section of the house and stucco on the 1836 front addition."
 
Regarding War in the Backyard. This is one of seven battlefield interpretive markers at Rose Hill. See the related markers section below for a listing of the walking tour, or the Kernstown Battles Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a driving tour.
 
Related markers.
Rear of Rose Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
4. Rear of Rose Hill
As seen on the photo on the marker, the east facing wing off the main house is a portion of the original log structure.
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kernstown Battles Virtual Tour by Markers. This marker is related to several markers in the area detailing the actions of two separate battles occurring around Kernstown during the Civil War. The sites include walking trails at the Pritchard-Grim Farm and Rose Hill. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Rose Hill - Museum of the Shenandoah. The walking tour of Rose Hill is open for self-guided tours on the third Saturday of each month April through October from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of First Kernstown Summary. The action around Rose Hill is discussed in phase three of this National Parks Service battle summary. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Rose Hill Farm. (PDF) National Register of Historic Places paperwork for Rose Hill offers many details concerning the history of the farm. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,316 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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