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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
South Lake Tahoe in El Dorado County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Pope Estate

From Cabin to Lodge

 
 
The Pope Estate - From Cabin to Lodge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
1. The Pope Estate - From Cabin to Lodge Marker
Inscription. The Pope Estate is the largest of the three estates at the Tallac Historic Site. In 1894, George P. Tallant built a 2,000 square foot rustic-style summer cabin on this site. Five years later, San Francisco businessman William Tevis and his wife Marabella Pacheco bought it and expanded it to more than twice its original size. The grounds include numerous outbuildings, an arboretum, and a pond.

George A. Pope bought the estate in 1923, renaming it “Vatican Lodge,” a humorous reference to the family's name. The Popes added several additions to the property and used the estate in the summers until 1965, when the family transferred the land and buildings to the US Forest Service.
 
Erected by Tallac Historic Site, Tahoe Heritage Foundation and the US Forest Service.
 
Location. 38° 56.363′ N, 120° 2.803′ W. Marker is in South Lake Tahoe, California, in El Dorado County. Marker can be reached from Heritage Way east of Emerald Bay Road (California Highway 89). Click for map. The Pope Estate is located on the grounds of the Tallac Historic Site. Marker is located at the front of the building (lake side). Marker is in this post office area: South Lake Tahoe CA 96150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
From Cabin to Lodge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
2. From Cabin to Lodge Marker
are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Baldwin House & Tallac Museum (within shouting distance of this marker); Discover the Tallac Historic Site (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tahoe By Car (approx. 2.8 miles away); Vikingsholm – A Scandinavian Castle (approx. 2.8 miles away); Da ow a ga – Lake Tahoe (approx. 2.8 miles away); Fannette Island (approx. 2.8 miles away); The Hermit of Emerald Bay (approx. 2.8 miles away); The Pony Express (approx. 5.9 miles away in Nevada). Click for a list of all markers in South Lake Tahoe.
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Photos Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
3. Photos Displayed on Marker
Left Portrait:
Lloyd Tevis lost much of his fortune in the early 1920s and was forced to sell the estate he had spent so many years renovating.

Right Portrait:
George Pope, Sr. worked in the lumber and shipping business for the Pope and Talbot Company, located in Port Gamble, Washington.

Building photos with Inset -
A House Expands
Notice the photo below of the Tallant House. Can you see the difference between the older Tallant House and the Tevis-Pope House today?
The Pope Estate Main House image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
4. The Pope Estate Main House
Marker is located off photo to the right.
Facing North image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
5. Facing North
Rear View image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
6. Rear View
This covered walkway leads to the servant's dining room and the school room.
The Servant's Dining Room and The Upstairs School Room image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
7. The Servant's Dining Room and The Upstairs School Room
A Room With A View image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
8. A Room With A View
Guests at the Pope Estate had the option of staying in one of three unique cabins, each with its own charm.
Many liked the “Log Cabin” best because it was closest to the lake. The cabin across and up the lawn, called the “Pacheco,” was reserved for guests who wanted a more luxurious stay. The ‘Twin” cabin, with four bedrooms and two bathrooms, could accommodate a fairly large party.
The Log Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
9. The Log Cabin
The “Log Cabin” was expanded at some point. The bark- siding changes direction (from horizontal to vertical) toward the back of the building.
Architectural Detail Above the Entrance to the Log Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
10. Architectural Detail Above the Entrance to the Log Cabin
Architectural Detail Above the Fireplace in the Main Room of the Log Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
11. Architectural Detail Above the Fireplace in the Main Room of the Log Cabin
The Pacheco image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
12. The Pacheco
The Pacheco building was named after Tevis’s father-in-law Romualdo Pacheco, the first native Californian governor born in the state.
The Twin image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
13. The Twin
View of Lake Tahoe from in Front of The Log Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle
14. View of Lake Tahoe from in Front of The Log Cabin
The Tevis Arboretum & Gazebo image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
15. The Tevis Arboretum & Gazebo
On any beautiful Tahoe summer afternoon, you might find members of the family and their guests enjoying tea here in the luxurious arboretum gardens. Gazebos and "summer homes" like this one were common architectural features during the early 20th century.
The arboretum and grounds of the Pope Estate were left dormant during the transition from private land to public land between 1973 and 2004. Volunteers and partners have spent many hours bringing the area closer to its original grandeur.
Supporting a Life of Ease image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
16. Supporting a Life of Ease
The Pope complex is the largest of the Estates, and the main house the most elaborate and least rustic of the three. It is a good example of the fact that construction practices at Tahoe during the period favored the use of lavish effects and often ignored structural soundness.
The Tevis and Pope Families provided their guests total convenience. The house also had to be heavily maintained and required much upkeep. All the work was performed by a butler, maids, cooks, gardeners, and many other servants.
Supporting a Life of Ease Wayside Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
17. Supporting a Life of Ease Wayside Marker
The rear of the main house is seen in the background
The Laundry image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
18. The Laundry
One of several outbuildings on the estate. This was staffed by Washoe Indians and later by Chinese. Linens were washed and ironed daily. The laundry was hung on lines stretched between trees - out of sight of family and friends.
The Pope Estate image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
19. The Pope Estate
At the entrance to the Pope Estate as you leave the Baldwin Estate. The reverse of this sign reads: "The Baldwin Estate"
Sign at Entrance to the Tallac Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 14, 2010
20. Sign at Entrance to the Tallac Historic Site
Located on Highway 89 (Emerald Bay Road)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,301 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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