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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Addison in Somerset County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Great Crossings

 
 
Great Crossings Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
1. Great Crossings Marker
Inscription. About one half mile above this point is the "Great Crossings" of the Youghiogheny River, where George Washington crossed November 18th, 1753, when sent as envoy by Gov. Dinwiddie of Virginia to the French Commandant at Fort Le Boeuf.

Washington, on his military expedition to the Ohio, encamped there with his forces, May 18th to 24th, 1754, and from that point explored the Youghiogheny.

There, also, Major General Braddock, with his army, crossed June 24th, 1755, on his march against Fort Duquesne.
 
Erected 1912 by the Great Crossings Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Braddock’s Road and Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the George Washington Slept Here marker series.
 
Location. 39° 44.801′ N, 79° 20.088′ W. Marker is in Addison, Pennsylvania, in Somerset County. Marker is on Main Street west of National Pike (U.S. 40), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at the Petersburg Toll House. Marker is in this post office area: Addison PA 15411, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Toll House (approx. 0.2 miles away); National Road
Petersburgh Tollhouse and Great Crossings marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, September 22, 2007
2. Petersburgh Tollhouse and Great Crossings marker
(approx. 2.3 miles away); Pennsylvania (approx. 2.3 miles away); Bear Camp (approx. 3.3 miles away in Maryland); a different marker also named The National Road (approx. 5.3 miles away in Maryland). Click for a list of all markers in Addison.
 
More about this marker. The Great Crossings are now much further away than half a mile from this point. This marker was originally placed on the stone bridge that took Route 40 across the Youghiogheny River at the town of Somerfield. The bridge—and the town—are now at the bottom of the Youghiogheny reservoir.
 
Also see . . .  A Bridge to the 19th Century. 1999 Article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette by Patricia Lowry. It describes the appearance of the National Road's Great Crossings bridge when the water level of the Youghiogheny reservoir fell to record levels. Also goes into the history of the Great Crossings. (Submitted on May 13, 2006.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraLandmarksNotable EventsNotable PersonsWar, French and Indian
 
Marker Next To the Petersburg Toll House in Addison image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 11, 2006
3. Marker Next To the Petersburg Toll House in Addison
U.S. 40 Today Near the Great Crossings image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
4. U.S. 40 Today Near the Great Crossings
The Great Crossings are now at the bottom of the Youghiogheny reservoir, pictured here.
Great Crossings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, November 26, 2015
5. Great Crossings Marker
In Nov. 2015 the water level dropped and exposed part of the old stone bridge which the Old National Road crossed and where this marker was originally placed.
Great Crossings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, November 26, 2015
6. Great Crossings Marker
A closer view of the old stone bridge about half of it is covered with sand. Marker was once attached to this bridge where the Old National Road crossed the river.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,714 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on , by Forest McDermott of Masontown, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on October 31, 2016.
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