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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Soda Springs in Caribou County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Brigham Young Summer Home

 
 
Brigham Young Summer Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jack Duffy, September 6, 2010
1. Brigham Young Summer Home Marker
Inscription. On this site in 1870, the first house in Soda Springs, Uppertown was built under the direction of John Walmsley. It was a one room log cabin twenty-two by eighteen feet, with floor, windows, and shingle roof, known as the Brigham Young Summer Home. He enjoyed the health benefits from the famous springs os soda water. The cabin stood until 1944 when the roof caved in during an attempt to move it. From the logs in the cabin these rustic seats were made. Brigham Young planned the wide streets and square blocks of the settlement.
 
Erected 1960 by Daughters of Utah Pioneers. (Marker Number 260.)
 
Location. 42° 39.267′ N, 111° 35.983′ W. Marker is in Soda Springs, Idaho, in Caribou County. Marker is on Main Street (U.S. 30), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. In front of the Brigham Young Lodge. Marker is at or near this postal address: 120 East 2nd Street, Soda Springs ID 83276, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. A Grand Vision (here, next to this marker).
 
Categories. EnvironmentSettlements & Settlers
 
Brigham Young Summer Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jack Duffy, September 6, 2010
2. Brigham Young Summer Home Marker
Brigham Young Summer Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jack Duffy, September 6, 2010
3. Brigham Young Summer Home Marker
Brigham Young image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
4. Brigham Young
This c. 1875 lithograph of Brigham Young by Hartwig Bornemann hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Brigham Young converted to Mormonism in 1832 and gradually rose in the leadership structure until he became the head of the Twelve Apostles under Joseph Smith. After Smith's murder by an anti­Mormon mob in 1844, Young assumed leadership of the larger portion of the church. In 1847 he led the Mormons from Nebraska to the Great Basin, where he founded Salt Lake City as the new church headquarters. He oversaw the migration of tens of thousands of Mormon converts to the West and the founding of hundreds of settlements. The Mormon majority elected Young as governor, but he was soon replaced by an appointed territorial governor. Political conflicts and challenges to the Mormons' separatist communal and theocratic venture led the United States to dispatch troops to Utah in 1857 and assert federal authority.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jack Duffy of West Jordan, Utah. This page has been viewed 733 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Jack Duffy of West Jordan, Utah.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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