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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Poughkeepsie in Dutchess County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge

National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark

 
 
Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 4, 2010
1. Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge Marker
Inscription. The Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge is the oldest surviving steel cantilever bridge in the world, and when built, had the longest truss and cantilever spans. The bridge provided the first, and only, all-rail route across the Husdon River south of Albany, and it facilitated the movement of coal eastward and manufactured goods westward for 85 years. Restored as the Walkway Over the Hudson, the bridge provides an outstanding example of adaptive reuse. Its designers were Thomas C. Clarke (ASCE President 1896) and Charles MacDonald (ASCE President 1908).

Constructed: 1886-1889               Dedicated: 2009
 
Erected 2009.
 
Location. 41° 42.63′ N, 73° 56.677′ W. Marker is in Poughkeepsie, New York, in Dutchess County. Click for map. Bridge and marker are accessible only by foot, from the western terminus in Highland (Ulster County) or the eastern terminus in Poughkeepsie (Dutchess County). Marker is in this post office area: Poughkeepsie NY 12601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Walkway Loop Trail (approx. 0.3 miles away); Walkway Over the Hudson (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Queen City of the Hudson (approx. 0.3
Pedestrians on the Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 4, 2010
2. Pedestrians on the Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge
miles away); River That Flows Both Ways (approx. 0.4 miles away); Victor C. Waryas Memorial Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); Thomas Dongan (approx. half a mile away); General Casimir Pulaski (approx. 0.8 miles away); Poughkeepsie Vietnam Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Poughkeepsie.
 
Regarding Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge. The bridge is also known as the Walkway over the Hudson and the Hudson Valley Rail-Trail.
 
Also see . . .
1. Library of Congress - Historic American Engineering Record. (Submitted on September 8, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.)
2. Wikipedia entry for the Poughkeepsie Bridge. (Submitted on September 8, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRailroads & StreetcarsWaterways & Vessels
 
Southern view of the Mid-Hudson Bridge over the Hudson River image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 4, 2010
3. Southern view of the Mid-Hudson Bridge over the Hudson River
Northern view of Hudson River image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 4, 2010
4. Northern view of Hudson River
Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 2, 2010
5. Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge
Taken from Waryas Park on the Poughkeepsie side of the Hudson River
Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 2, 2010
6. Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge
Looking north up the Hudson River. The bridge is 1/2 mile long over the river. It extends another 1/2 mile to the right where it finally meets level ground.
<i>Poughkeepsie Bridge, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard by the Detroit Publishing Company, 1904
7. Poughkeepsie Bridge, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
The Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge is a remarkable achievement, first proposed in 1855. After the Civil War, the idea was taken more seriously. After several false starts, successful construction began in 1886. The first train crossed December 29, 1888. When the bridge opened in 1889, it was the longest bridge in North America and the first bridge to span the Hudson River between Albany and New York City. It became a key transportation hub linking western raw materials to eastern industrial centers until the fire in 1974 closed it. - Walkway Over the Hudson (Walkway.org)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 938 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   7. submitted on . • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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