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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Milledgeville in Baldwin County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The March to the Sea

 
 
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 5, 2010
1. The March to the Sea Marker
Inscription. On Nov. 15, 1864, after destroying Atlanta and cutting his communications with the North, Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, USA, began his destructive campaign for Savannah -- the March to the Sea. He divided his army [US] into two wings. The Right Wing (15th and 17th Corps), Maj. General O.O. Howard, USA, moved south via McDonough to feint at Macon, crossed the Ocmulgee at Seven Islands (9 miles SE of Jackson), and concentrated around Gordon (17 miles SW), where it would be in communication with the Left Wing, then converging on Milledgeville. Kilpatrick’s cavalry division covered the right of the army as far as Gordon, skirmishing continually with Wheeler’s cavalry [CS].

The Left Wing (14th and 20th corps), Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, USA, marched east from Atlanta in two columns. The 14th Corps, Maj. Gen. J. C. Davis, USA, accompanied by Gen. Sherman turned southeast and marched via Covington and Shady Dale, reaching Milledgeville on the 23rd. The 20th Corps, Brig. Gen. A.S. Williams, USA, continued east past Madison to feint at Augusta, but turned south through Eatonton, reaching here on the 22nd.

Beginning on the 24th, Slocum moved toward Sandersville and Howard toward Tennille Station (4 miles S of Sandersville). Kilpatrick marched rapidly eastward to cut the Augusta-Savannah railroad and release the Union prisoners-of-war
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 5, 2010
2. The March to the Sea Marker
Looking north on North Clark Street at the West Montgomery Street intersection.
confined in Camp Lawton, an open stockade 5 miles north of Millen (84 miles SE).
 
Erected 2010 by Georgia Historical Society. (Marker Number 005-18.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Shermans March to the Sea marker series.
 
Location. 33° 4.954′ N, 83° 13.967′ W. Marker is in Milledgeville, Georgia, in Baldwin County. Marker is on Clark Street (Georgia Route 243) 0 miles south of West Montgomery Street (U.S. 441), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. The marker stands opposite the Georgia College and State University on North Clark Street. Marker is in this post office area: Milledgeville GA 31061, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. State College (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dr Charles Holmes Herty Statesman -Chemist (approx. 0.2 miles away); Birthplace of Charles Holmes Herty (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Governor’s Mansion (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Great Seal of Georgia (approx. ¼ mile away); De Soto in Georgia (approx. ¼ mile away); Brown-Stetson-Sanford House (approx. ¼ mile away); Tomlinson Fort House (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Milledgeville.
 
More about this marker.
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 5, 2010
3. The March to the Sea Marker
Looking across North Clark Street at one of the buildings of the Georgia College and State University.
This marker replaced an earlier marker of the same title and text erected by the Georgia Historical Commission in 1957, which had vanished.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 5, 2010
4. The March to the Sea Marker
Looking south on North Clark Street toward the Old Governor's Mansion.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,289 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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